Psy.D. Program Course Sequence

 

 

Foundational courses (500-600 level) are listed in Blue. 

Additional M.S./Psy.D. track requirements are listed in Red. 

Upper-level doctoral courses (800 and above) are listed in Black.  

  

YEAR 

FALL 

SPRING 

SUMMER 

I

  

Foundational 

Courses 

  

GRCP 500 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3) 

GRCP 503 Psychopathology (3) 

GRCP 514 Development Across the Lifespan (3) 

Elective #1 

 

  

GRCP 506 Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy I (3) 

GRCP 510 Research Design and Methodology (3) 

GRCP 512 Legal and Ethical Issues (3) 

Elective #2 

 

 

GRCP 508 Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy II (3) 

GRCP 532 The Role of Culture and Gender in Counseling and  

Psychotherapy (3) 

GRCP 745 Clinical Experience I  (3) 

 

 

II

  

  

GRCP 755 Clinical Experience II (3) 

GRCP 800 Assessment I (3) 

GRCP 801 Personality and Individual Differences (3) 

GRCP 801L Personality and Individual Differences Lab (1) 

GRCP 765 Clinical Experience III (3) 

GRCP 802 Assessment II (3) 

GRCP 806 Modern and Historic Psychodynamic Principles (3) 

GRCP 806L Modern and Historic Psychodynamic Principles Lab (1) 

GRCP  861 Assessment III (3) 

GRCP 804 Historical Foundations of Psychology (3) 

GRCP 844 Dissertation Mentoring I (1) 

  

 

 

 

III

  

  

GRCP 901 Practicum IA (1.5) 

GRCP 818 Statistical Applications (3) 

GRCP 845 Dissertation Mentoring II (1) 

GRCP 808 Family Therapy (3) 

GRCP 808L Family Therapy Lab (1) 

  

GRCP 903 Practicum IB (1.5) 

GRCP 810 Biological Bases of Behavior (3) 

GRCP 820 Advanced Seminar in Techniques of Therapy (3) 

GRCP 820L Advanced Seminar in Techniques of Therapy Lab (1) 

GRCP 846 Dissertation Mentoring III (1) 

  

GRCP 904 Practicum IC (1.5) 

GRCP 812 Psychopharmacology (3) 

GRCP 836 Dissertation Seminar (3) 

GRCP 838 Social Bases of Behavior (3) 

  

  

IV

 

 

 

GRCP 905 Practicum IIA (1.5) 

GRCP 824 Professional Practice Issues in Psychology (3) 

GRCP 828 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior (3) 

 

GRCP 906 Practicum IIB (1.5) 

GRCP 816 Advanced Topics in Human Diversity (3) 

  

  

 

Clinical Competency Exam 

GRCP 907 Practicum IIC (1.5) 

GRCP 815 Evidence-Based Therapies: Research, Theory and Practice (3) 

 

V

 

 

 

Comprehensive Exam 

GRCP 829 Supervision and Consultation (3) 

Elective #1 (3) 

  

 

Elective #2  (3) 

  

  

  

  

 

Elective #3 (3) 

  

  

  

  

 

VI

 

 

GRCP 950 Internship IA (1) 

GRCP 960 Internship IIA (1) 

 

GRCP 951 Internship IB (1) 

GRCP 961 Internship IIB (1) 

 

GRCP 952 Internship IC (1) 

GRCP 962 Internship IIC (1) 

 

  

† Plus GRCP 914 Dissertation Advising (2 cr.) every semester after the completion of Dissertation Seminar until the Dissertation has been successfully defended. 

 

 

† Plus GRCP 914 Dissertation Advising (2 cr.) every semester after the completion of Dissertation Seminar until the Dissertation has been successfully defended.


 

PSY.D. PROGRAM: ADMISSIONS

The minimum requirements for admission to the Psy.D. Program are as follows: 

  • Bachelor’s degree with 12 undergraduate credits (four courses) in psychology, which must include General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Statistics, and one additional course in psychology, all completed with a minimum grade of B. Applicants with bachelor’s degrees must enter via the M.S./Psy.D. track.
    or 
    Master’s degree in clinical and/or counseling psychology or a closely related field. These applicants may apply to transfer up to 30 credits of foundational courses (500-600 level). Applicants who are able to transfer at least 15 credits may be eligible for admission directly to Year II of the Psy.D. program. To be considered for admission with advanced standing, the applicant’s master’s degree must have included at least two semesters of supervised practicum or internship or the applicant may submit evidence of relevant supervised work experience in a mental health setting.

    The following materials are required for application to the Psy.D. program:
  • Application Form with non-refundable application fee
  • Transcripts of all previous graduate and undergraduate college coursework
    Official transcripts should be sent to the applicant in a sealed envelope with the registrar’s name signed across the seal. Do not open the official transcript envelopes. If the seal has been broken, the transcript is no longer official and will not be accepted as part of the application packet.
  • Standardized Test Scores
    • Applicants with bachelor’s degrees must submit GRE General Test scores.
    • Applicants with master’s degrees may submit either GRE General Test scores or MAT scores.
      Test scores should be sent directly to Chestnut Hill College from the testing agency. Tests must have been taken within five years of the date of application.
     
  • Three letters of recommendation
    Letters of recommendation should be from faculty members and/or clinical supervisors who are familiar with the applicant’s skills and potential. At least one letter should pertain to the applicant’s clinical performance and/or potential, and at least one letter must pertain to the applicant’s academic performance and potential. For applicants seeking advanced standing, one of the letters of recommendation must be an evaluation from a practicum supervisor or a supervisor at a work placement in a mental health setting. Complete and sign the top portion of the recommendation form before forwarding it to the individual who will provide your reference. Ask that the letter be returned to you in a sealed envelope. The person completing the recommendation should sign over the seal of the envelope flap. Do not open the sealed envelope when it has been returned to you. 
  • Personal essay
    In an essay of approximately 1200 words (5 double-spaced pages), please address each of the following topics:
    (1) What unique qualifications do you believe make you suited to a career in professional psychology?
    (2) How does the Psy.D. Program at Chestnut Hill College fit with your professional goals? Please be as specific as possible.
    (3) One of the objectives of the Psy.D. Program is to foster “an understanding and appreciation of cultural factors relevant to the delivery of psychological services to a diverse client population.” Please discuss your background and interest in the topics of diversity and serving diverse populations, specifically addressing how you can contribute to the Psy.D. Program’s commitment to training students who will be competent to provide services to an increasingly diverse population of potential clients. (The Program adopts APA’s definition of “diversity,” which includes but is not limited to the following characteristics: age, disabilities, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, language, national origin, race, religion, culture, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status.)
    Please Note: Essays will be evaluated both for content and for writing style.
  • TOEFL, TSE (Test of Spoken English), and TWE (Test of Written English)
    Required of all applicants for whom English is not the first language.
  • Personal Interview
    A personal interview with members of the faculty is required. Invitation to the personal interview is extended to selected applicants after review of the submitted materials. At the interview applicants will be required to disclose any past criminal history. In some cases an applicant may be required to undergo a criminal background check.

Transfer Credits
A catalog course description and syllabus are required for any course for which the applicant wishes to request transfer credits. These materials must be submitted with the application if the applicant wishes to be considered for admission directly to Year II. Syllabi and course descriptions are not necessary for graduate courses completed at Chestnut Hill College. See the policy on Transfer Credits (below) for more information.

Applicants currently enrolled in other doctoral programs:
Applicants who currently attend or who previously attended another doctoral program must submit a letter from the Chair of the program indicating that the student either is in good standing or left the program in good standing. A full application packet is required.

Admissions Selection Criteria:
Each of the above criteria (test scores, undergraduate GPA, master’s GPA, recommendations and writing) is assigned a point value. Applicants whose overall total points meet the standards set by the program faculty are invited for an interview. Admissions decisions are made after the interviews are completed. Prior clinical experience, professional presentations, publications, and other indicators of achievement in the field of psychology will also be taken into consideration when evaluating applicants. Following the interview, applicants may be offered a space in the entering class or a decision regarding acceptance or rejection may be deferred until a later date. Applicants may also be placed on a waiting list, referred to the master’s program, or rejected.

Application Deadline:
The Psy.D. program accepts applicants for the fall semester only. The program accepts applicants to Year I on a rolling admission basis until the entering class is filled. Application by January 15th is encouraged. The application deadline for Year II is January 15th. All applicants whose applications are complete by January 15th will be notified of their status by April 15th. Incomplete application packets cannot be considered. It is recommended that the applicant submit all materials except for the test scores as a complete packet. If that is not possible, the application form with fee must accompany the first materials submitted.

Admission Deposits:
Applicants offered admission must submit an initial deposit that is non-refundable after April 15th, and a second non-refundable deposit by May 1st. These deposits will be credited against the tuition for the first semester of enrollment. Applicants who fail to submit the required deposits on time will forfeit their place in the entering class. 
 

 

PSY.D. PROGRAM: POLICIES
• If there is no stated doctoral policy on a particular subject, the current School of Graduate Studies policy applies.
• Additional policies and procedures relevant to the doctoral practicum can be found in the Psy.D. Assessment and Clinical Practicum Manual.
• Additional policies and procedures relevant to the doctoral internship can be found in the Psy.D. Pre-doctoral Internship Manual.
• Additional policies and procedures relevant to the dissertation can be found in the Psy.D. Dissertation Manual.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS, PROBATION AND DISMISSAL

GRADES
The minimum acceptable grade in a doctoral academic course is "B-." If a doctoral student receives a "C+" or lower in any doctoral course, the student is placed on academic probation. A second grade of “C” or “C+” in any course will result in dismissal from the program. After receiving a single grade of “C” or “C+”, the student may be required to repeat the course or complete other remedial academic work, but the original grade of “C” or “C+” remains on the transcript and the student continues on academic probation for the duration of the program.

A grade of "F" in any class will result in dismissal from the program.

PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP
The Psy.D. Assessment and Clinical Practicum Manual and the Psy.D. Pre-doctoral Internship Manual provide information regarding the probation, suspension, and termination policies that are specific to practicum and internship. Please refer to the practicum and internship manuals for further information. Full knowledge of, and compliance with, the policies and procedures outlined in the Practicum and Internship Manuals is required for successful movement through the Psy.D. program.

 
PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE PROBLEMS
The faculty is responsible for determining whether each student’s emotional stability and interpersonal behavior are suitable for a career in clinical psychology. In general, the student receives feedback in these areas on the Global Review (see below). If the student’s behavior warrants, it may be necessary for the faculty to take more immediate action. In most instances, the faculty will endeavor to discuss the issue with the student before taking further action. If the student’s behavior constitutes a breach of professional ethics, or the student’s behavior poses a serious threat to clients or to other students, or the student’s behavior significantly disrupts the learning process for other students, or the student’s behavior interferes with their progress in the program, the student will be suspended or dismissed from the program.

The faculty has the right and professional responsibility to obtain and evaluate personal information when students are unable to perform training or professionally related activities competently or pose a threat to themselves or others. To discharge this duty, the faculty may require a student to undergo a psychological evaluation or participate in psychotherapy. The department must approve the provider of these services in advance and the student is responsible for all fees associated with the evaluation and/or treatment. Refusal to participate in the mandated evaluation and/or treatment and/or refusal to authorize release of information from the evaluating or treating psychologist constitutes grounds for immediate suspension or dismissal from the program. The department will provide the student and the evaluator a list of questions for which answers are required.

PUBLIC DOMAIN STATEMENTS
Expectations of appropriate and professional behavior extend beyond the classroom and field placement setting.

Content posted online by students in locations such as a facebook page, personal web page, blog, etc. may be a factor in determining appropriateness for the profession. Any postings about clients, and any derogatory postings about supervisors, faculty, programs or sites, or any postings which present you in an inappropriate or unprofessional light may be grounds for discipline or termination from your off-campus placement or from the program

GLOBAL REVIEW
The Department of Professional Psychology conducts a global evaluation for each doctoral student periodically. Student progress is reviewed by the faculty and a written evaluation is presented to the student. Areas addressed in the Global Review include academic performance, professional and ethical behavior and thinking, clinical skills, interpersonal skills, and ability to accept supervision. The purpose of the Global Review is to give students timely feedback so that any issues that are identified can be addressed early. More information on the Global Review may be found in the Psy.D. Student Handbook. All students are expected to be familiar with this policy.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
Each student must pass a written Comprehensive Examination and a Clinical Competency Examination. If either examination is not passed on the first attempt, the student has two opportunities to retake the Comprehensive Examination and one opportunity to retake the Clinical Competency Examination. Students who do not pass the Comprehensive Examination by the third attempt or the Clinical Competency Examination by the second attempt will be dismissed from the program.

DISMISSAL
Students will be dismissed from the Psy.D. program if any one of the following occurs:
1. A final grade of “F” in any course
2. Two final grades below “B-“ in any two courses
3. Dismissal from practicum or internship, or withdrawal from a practicum or internship without following appropriate procedure
4. Consistent evidence that a student’s emotional stability, behavior, or interpersonal skills are inadequate or interfere with the student making adequate progress in the program or are inappropriate for a career in clinical psychology
5. Any behavior that constitutes a violation of APA Ethical Standards will result in immediate dismissal from the program
6. Plagiarism or cheating
7. Failure to meet financial obligations to the college
8. Failure to pass the Comprehensive Examination after three attempts
9. Failure to pass the Clinical Competency Examination after two attempts
10. Failure to produce a dissertation of acceptable quality, and/or failure to pass the Final Oral Defense of the dissertation
11. Failure to complete all program requirements within eight (8) years of matriculation (unless a leave of absence has been approved. See Leave of Absence policy below).
Because the above degree requirements are generally met in a sequential fashion (e.g., completion of internship follows completion of practicum; defense of the dissertation may be the final step in completing program requirements), it is possible that a student who has performed successfully in the early stages of the program may not be able to complete successfully the requirements at the later stages (e.g., internship, Comprehensive Examination, dissertation). If the student’s behavior and performance warrant it, dismissal from the program could occur at any time up to the date the degree is conferred.

 

APPEAL AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

APPEAL PROCEDURES
A student may appeal any decision rendered by the faculty that affects the student’s standing in the program. An appeal differs from a grievance. In an appeal, a student requests a reconsideration of a decision and submits evidence that supports his or her request. Students may file a grievance if they believe that policies were not applied in a fair or just manner, if they believe that decisions were not rendered according to the existing procedures, or if they believe that they had been the victim of unfair or discriminatory practices. See the section on Grievances below for information on filing grievances. Appeal procedures specific to the dissertation may be found in the Psy.D. Dissertation Manual.

For grade appeals, please consult The School of Graduate Studies Grade Appeal Policy in this catalog.

Appeals other than grade appeals should be submitted in writing to the Chair. The appeal must be submitted within 30 days of the date of the departmental decision. The appeal should include all documentation necessary to render an opinion. The Chair, in consultation with the departmental faculty, will render a decision which will be communicated to the student in writing within 30 days of the receipt of the student’s appeal. If the student wishes to carry the appeal further, a written appeal must be submitted to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies within 30 days of the date of the department’s decision. This appeal must include all documentation originally submitted to the Chair, along with the Chair’s response. The Dean will follow the procedures outlined in Steps 4-8 of The School of Graduate Studies Conflict Resolution and Grievance Procedure outlined in this catalog.

The time frames in the preceding procedure will be strictly honored. Students who do not submit an appeal according to these time frames waive their right to appeal.

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES Students may file a grievance if they believe that policies were not applied in a fair or just manner, if they believe that decisions were not rendered according to existing procedures, or if they believe that they have been victims of unfair or discriminatory practices. Before filing a grievance, students should first attempt to resolve the problem directly with the individual(s) involved, and seek informal consultation from the Chair or from another faculty member, if needed.

Grievances must be filed in writing on the General Grievance Form, which is available from the Assistant to the Chair and may also be downloaded from the departmental Blackboard site.

Grievances are addressed according to The School of Graduate Studies Conflict Resolution and General Grievance Procedure outlined in this catalog.

DUE PROCESS Decisions regarding probation, suspension, or termination from the program are made in accordance with the policies and procedures described in this catalog, in the Psy.D. Student Handbook, the Psy.D. Assessment and Clinical Practicum Manual, and the Psy.D. Pre-doctoral Internship Manual. See Dismissal from the Psy.D. Program (above) for situations that would result in dismissal from the program.

A student who is placed on probation or suspension, or who will be dismissed from the program, will be notified in writing by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. In most instances, probation precedes suspension, and suspension precedes dismissal. However, there are circumstances, such as behavior that puts others at imminent risk; unethical behavior; or failure of a course or field placement, that warrant immediate dismissal. Students who are placed on probation or suspension, or who are dismissed from the program, have the right to appeal the decision according to the procedures outlined above.

ATTENDANCE See The School of Graduate Studies Attendance Policy.

CHEATING
See The School of Graduate Studies Cheating Policy.

CONCENTRATIONS AND ELECTIVES
Each concentration within the doctoral program will have a cap equal to one-half of the students in any doctoral class as determined at the beginning of the fall term (i.e., in a doctoral class of 18 students, each concentration would be capped at 9 students). Students wishing to change their area of concentration must make their request in writing to the Chair. If the concentration into which they wish to move is already full, the request will be denied but the student will be put on a waiting list. Should a space become available in a previously closed concentration, the space will be offered to the first person on the waiting list. After the completion of the first elective course, change of concentration is restricted. Because three courses are required for a concentration, any change after the first course must be from concentration to generalist or from generalist to concentration (possible only if the first course was taken in the desired concentration). A change from Marriage and Family Therapy to Psychological Assessment or vice versa is not possible after the first course has been completed. Any changes in concentration must be made at least one full month before the start of the semester in which an elective course is offered.
Elective courses may be capped at the maximum number of students in a concentration plus two (i.e., if there are 20 students in a given class, the cap on the concentration is 10 and the cap on the particular class may be set at 12 students at the discretion of the instructor). Preference in electives is given to those students who have declared a concentration. The remaining slots will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis with full registration and payment as the only way to reserve a space. Any student who has declared a concentration will be expected to register for the elective courses in their concentration.

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT IN THE PROGRAM
Students are required to maintain continuous enrollment in the program from the date of their initial matriculation until their completion of all degree requirements (coursework, practicums, internship, and dissertation defense). Failure to do so will be interpreted as the student’s withdrawal from the program unless the student has received prior approval to take a leave of absence from the program.
Students are expected to take all of the courses required each semester. Due to the sequential nature of the program, a student is normally not permitted to take courses out of sequence. Students who, for serious reasons, are unable to complete the required course load in any semester may request a reduced course schedule or leave of absence. A reduced course schedule is not possible during the residency year (Year III) unless the student has taken three consecutive semesters of 9 credits each earlier in the program. A reduced course schedule must begin in the fall semester and continue for the subsequent two terms (spring, summer). Students who find that they are unable to complete the required course load in spring or summer terms must request a leave of absence for one full year (three consecutive terms). It is generally not possible for students to take a leave of absence for less than one full year, unless they have completed all coursework, practicums, and internship. Students should consider the implications for financial aid eligibility before requesting a reduced schedule or leave of absence. A leave of absence is not counted towards the eight-year limit for degree completion, but students who follow a reduced schedule are still required to complete all degree requirements within eight years. Students should submit their requests to the Chair in writing with accompanying documentation (e.g., physician statements). Requests sent via e-mail will not be considered. Requests for a reduced course load or leave of absence are approved only under exceptional circumstances. See the policy on Leave of Absence below.

DEFERRED ADMISSION TO THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM
Applicants who are accepted to the Psy.D. program may apply to defer matriculation for one year by sending a request in writing to the Chair by June 1st of the year in which matriculation was to have begun. Students who wish to defer admission are still required to submit the admission deposits. Students who fail to do so will forfeit their offer of admission. If the deferral is approved, the student must submit an additional non-refundable deposit by February 1st of the following year. Candidates who do not pay this third deposit will forfeit their place in the incoming class and will also forfeit the non-refundable deposit already paid. All deposits are credited against the tuition for the first semester of enrollment. Approval to defer admission is not automatic, and is dependent on a variety of factors. If the applicant’s request for deferral is denied, he or she may reapply to the program at a later date. It is not possible to defer admission for more than one year.

DISCLOSURE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION
The following policies about student disclosure of personal information comply with the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002). These policies apply to all graduate courses in psychology.

Disclosure in Courses: Some courses require students to share personal information, either orally or in writing, germane to understanding self-growth, developing insight into countertransference dynamics, or conducting effective treatment. This may include family of origin issues and other personal information that could affect clinical and professional development.

Disclosure in Supervision: Students are required to share personal information with their supervisors germane to understanding self-growth, developing insight into countertransference dynamics, or conducting effective treatment. This may include family of origin issues, history of abuse or trauma, psychological treatment and other personal information that could affect clinical and professional development.

The faculty has the right and professional responsibility to obtain and evaluate personal information when students do not make reasonable progress in the program or pose a threat to themselves or others. To discharge this duty, the faculty may require a student to undergo a psychological evaluation or participate in psychotherapy. The department must approve the provider of these services in advance and the student is responsible for all fees associated with the evaluation and/or treatment. Refusal to participate in the mandated evaluation and/or treatment and/or refusal to authorize release of information from the evaluating or treating psychologist constitutes grounds for immediate suspension or dismissal from the program.

DISSERTATION ADVISING
Students are required to register for Dissertation Advising (2 credits) beginning with the semester following the completion of GRCP 836 (Dissertation Seminar) and continuing until the dissertation has been successfully defended.

ETHICAL STANDARDS
All students are required to be familiar with the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002) and to abide by these principles at all times. A copy of these principles may be found online at www.apa.org.

The student is required not only to demonstrate competence in the areas of academic study and clinical training, but also to demonstrate familiarity with the ethics of professional practice and to behave in an ethical and professional manner at all times. Behavior in violation of ethical or professional standards of conduct constitutes grounds for immediate dismissal from the program.

FINANCIAL AID
See Financial Aid section of this catalog for information on procedures for applying for financial aid.
The Psy.D. program awards a limited number of assistantships to qualified students. Assistantships are awarded based on need, student qualifications, previous achievement, and potential. More information on assistantships may be found in the Psy.D Student Handbook.
Advanced doctoral students are also eligible for Directed Teaching. These students teach an undergraduate or graduate course under the supervision of a faculty member in exchange for a stipend and one credit of Directed Teaching.
 

GRADE APPEALS See The School of Graduate Studies Grade Appeal Policy.

INCOMPLETE GRADES
See The School of Graduate Studies Incomplete Grade Policy.

INDEPENDENT STUDY
A student may be approved for independent study in a doctoral course only under highly unusual circumstances and only with the written permission of the Chair. If independent study is approved, then The School of Graduate Studies policy on Independent Study applies.

INSTRUCTIONAL TIME
A three-credit graduate class in psychology requires 42 hours of instructional time. For a three-credit graduate class in psychology, it is expected that at least 75% of the scheduled class time will be spent in face-to-face classroom contact. The remaining time may be spent in other educational activities that are directly linked to the stated course objectives. These activities may include additional reading, research, and/or writing assignments beyond those normally required for the course; small group activities; Blackboard-based discussion; or other experiential activities directly relevant to the learning objectives of the course. It is the responsibility of the faculty to ensure that the objectives, requirements, and instructional activities of all courses are suitable for the number of credit hours earned.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE
In rare circumstances, a leave of absence may be granted. The term of a leave is one year (three consecutive academic terms). Due to the sequential nature of the program and the manner in which courses are scheduled, it is not possible to take a leave for only one or two semesters, unless the student has completed all coursework, practicums, and internship. To request a leave of absence from the program, the student must submit a written request to the Chair explaining the reasons for the request and supplying relevant documentation, such as physician statements. Requests submitted by e-mail will not be considered. Normally, requests for a leave of absence are approved only under exceptional circumstances. If the request is not approved, the student may voluntarily withdraw from the program and petition for reinstatement if they wish to return in the future (see Withdrawal Policy below). In these circumstances, reinstatement is not automatic. Students who do not enroll after the term of their approved leave has elapsed will be considered to have withdrawn from the program. It is not possible to extend a leave of absence beyond one year or to request a second leave of absence after one has already been taken. A leave of absence does not count towards the eight-year time limit for degree completion.

PLAGIARISM POLICY
See The School of Graduate Studies Plagiarism Policy.

PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS
The Department of Professional Psychology strongly recommends that all students in the program participate in psychotherapy to gain the insight necessary for optimal professional development. Although this is not a requirement, it may be mandated for students about whom the faculty has questions regarding their personal fitness for a career in clinical psychology.

READMISSION TO THE PSY.D. PROGRAM
The following policy applies to:
1. Applicants whose request for deferred admission has been denied and who do not matriculate in the program
2. Applicants who are offered admission but who decline the offer
3. Matriculated students who voluntary withdraw from the program
To be considered for readmission to the program, reapplication and payment of a re- application fee is necessary. Those who wish to be considered for readmission should contact the Director of Psy.D. Admissions to determine what material would need to be submitted. Readmission is not automatic, and depends on a variety of factors, including the availability of space in the class to which the individual would return.
Students who are dismissed from the program are not eligible for readmission.
The initial deposit is non-refundable after April 15th. A second non-refundable deposit is due by May 1st. Students who withdraw after registration forfeit the full tuition for the semester (see Withdrawal Policy).

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY
See The School of Graduate Studies Sexual Harassment Policy.

TRANSFER CREDITS
Policy
A catalog course description and syllabus is required for any course for which transfer credit is desired. Courses must be substantially similar in content and coverage to the corresponding course at Chestnut Hill College. Similarity is assessed by the faculty by comparing the syllabus to the syllabus of the course taught at Chestnut Hill College. To be considered for transfer credit, the course grade must be “B” or above.

The program will accept up to 30 transfer credits for foundational and elective courses at the 500-600 level for students who are admitted to Year II. The program will accept a maximum of 12 transfer credits for foundational and elective courses at the 500-600 level for students who are admitted to Year I.

The program will also consider transferring up to 18 credits for courses at the 800 level and above if (1) the course was taken in another APA-accredited doctoral program in clinical psychology and (2) the course was completed within five years of enrollment at CHC. Transfer credit will not be given for internship. In order to transfer credits from practicums, the applicant must submit a written evaluation by the practicum supervisor as well as a detailed accounting of the activities performed and the number of hours spent in each activity. This material will be evaluated and a decision made by the Chair in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training and other members of the department.

Procedure
1. Student submits a syllabus, catalog description, and official transcript showing the grade for the course for which transfer credit is requested.
2. This information is reviewed by the Chair or a designated member of the department faculty who has experience in the area covered by the course.
3. The faculty member compares the syllabus and catalog description to the syllabus and catalog description of the corresponding course at Chestnut Hill College. If there is “substantial similarity,” which is defined by coverage overlap of 80% or more, and if the official transcript grade was B or above, transfer credit will be granted. If either one of these criteria is not met, transfer credit will be denied.
4. If it is not clear if the criteria for “substantial similarity” are met, then the reviewer will request that the student submit additional information, such as copies of the course texts or other readings, or copies of graded assignments, test, or papers. In some instances the student may be required to obtain a written statement from the instructor of the course that explains in detail how the required content was covered in the course.
5. If it is still not clear whether the criteria for “substantial similarity” are met, the student will be given the option to take a Challenge Examination, which will be comparable to the final cumulative examination for the course for which transfer credit is requested. The student must obtain a grade of 75% or higher on this Challenge Examination in order to be awarded transfer credit for the course. Challenge Examinations are administered only with the permission of the Chair and only after the preceding steps in the procedure have been followed. Challenge Examinations are not available for courses at 800-level and above.

WAIVER OF DOCTORAL COURSES
No portion of the doctoral coursework may be waived. All coursework must be completed at Chestnut Hill College, unless transfer credit has been granted (see Transfer Credits).

WITHDRAWAL POLICY
The Psy.D. program follows the Withdrawal Policy of the School of Graduate Studies with the following exceptions:
1. Withdrawal from a course at any time requires written approval of the Chair. Permission to withdraw from a course is granted only under unusual circumstances, such as a serious illness or other emergency. Additional documentation, such as a statement from a physician, may be required to process the request for withdrawal. Students who withdraw from a course without the written approval of the Chair are considered to have withdrawn from the program and must petition for reinstatement if they desire to resume their studies. In these circumstances, reinstatement will generally be denied.
2. Doctoral tuition, fees and deposits are non-refundable. Students in the Psy.D. Program who withdraw from a course after registration are liable for the full tuition and fees for the course.
3. Withdrawal from a course will usually entail a leave of absence from the program. See the policies on Continuous Enrollment in the Program and Leave of Absence.
4. Withdrawal from practicum or internship requires the written approval of the Director of Clinical Training as well as the Chair.
As noted in the Withdrawal Policy of the School of Graduate Studies, any request to withdraw must be received prior to the final class meeting. It is not possible to retroactively withdraw from a course after the last class meeting.
 

GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Please note: All courses are graded according to the standard grading scale except otherwise noted.
GRCP 499 Introduction to Graduate Psychology 3 credits (non-degree)
Reviews the general principles necessary for doing graduate work in clinical and counseling psychology. Material covered includes: an introduction to the APA Standards for Publication, the use of Psychological Abstracts, computer data base searches and a brief review of statistics. Students without an undergraduate degree in psychology are required to take this course. Others may elect to take the course for review purposes. This course may not be used to satisfy degree requirements. This course must be taken during the student’s first three terms of enrollment.

GRCP 500 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy  

3 credits Familiarizes the student with the major theoretical schools of counseling and psychotherapy, including: Psychoanalytic, Existential, Humanistic, Behavioral, Gestalt, Cognitive, and Family Systems. Students will learn to distinguish among different approaches and acquire a working knowledge of the terminology and concepts identified with each approach.
GRCP 503 Psychopathology  

3 credits This course explores the emotional, cognitive, somatic, and behavioral symptoms of mental disturbance. Students will become acquainted with the subjective experience of various symptoms and symptom clusters, patterns of family and community responses to afflicted individuals, and research and evolving theories pertaining to the etiology of symptoms. Students will also be introduced to the use of the DSM-IV as a format for the classification of disorders and the choice of appropriate treatment. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the DSM-IV, including its multiaxial classification system, and will develop the ability to diagnose various mental disorders. Prerequisite: GRCP 500, or may be taken concurrently with GRCP 500.
GRCP 506 Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy I  

3 credits This course fosters the development of basic counseling and psychotherapy skills through a combination of didactic instruction and role-plays (including required videotaped role-plays). Focus is on establishing a therapeutic rapport, formulating appropriate directions for therapy, and conceptualizing strategies for intervention. Specific skills include listening, suicide intervention, assessment, formulation of questions, and empathic responses. Prerequisites: GRCP 500 and 503
GRCP 508 Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy II  

3 credits Focuses on advanced methods of using the therapeutic relationship for long-term change. Emphasis is placed on treating personality disorders, resistance to treatment, countertransference, and deepening the therapeutic alliance. This course incorporates experiential training which includes videotaping or live observation of role-plays. Prerequisites: GRCP 500, 503 and 506
GRCP 510 Research Design and Methodology  

3 credits An overview of many frequently used research designs in psychology. Through a study of research methodology, students learn how to select an appropriate research design and how to employ valid procedures in collecting data. The course will foster analytical and critical thinking skills through a combination of theory and practical experience, prepare students to read relevant research in their field and to write a research proposal, and provide background for future work in the area of research.
GRCP 512 Legal and Ethical Issues in Counseling and Psychotherapy  

3 credits The course familiarizes students with the history and development of professional ethics and standards and their legal implications in the areas of counseling and psychotherapy. Students will be required to become familiar with the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as ethical standards formulated by other professional associations. Topics covered include: privileged communication, confidentiality, rights of client and agency, civil commitment, licensure, and mental health laws. Prerequisites: GRCP 500 and 503
GRCP 514 Development Across the Lifespan: Individual and Family  

3 credits Covers human development from a lifespan perspective, with in-depth exploration of selected topics relevant to different periods in the life cycle for individuals and families. Students will be introduced to theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding key developmental issues as well as the role of the family and social context in human development.
GRCP 520 Thesis Seminar I  

3 credits This seminar provides students with an opportunity to meet weekly with a full-time faculty member to assist them in identifying a topic for the master’s thesis. Master of Arts students only. Prerequisites: GRCP 510 and 525
GRCP 522 Thesis Seminar II  

3 credits This seminar is a continuation of GRCP 520. Master of Arts students only. Prerequisite: GRCP 520
GRCP 525 Statistical Applications 

3 credits Introduces students to the main components of statistical theory and demonstrates how to analyze and interpret research data. In order to facilitate statistical analysis and handle actual research data, students are taught to use statistical software.
GRCP 530 Group Therapy  

3 credits Presents a theoretical and experiential understanding of group therapy techniques and processes. Students observe group process, practice interventions, and critique their own development as group therapists. Active involvement in didactic, practice groups is required.
GRCP 532 The Role of Culture & Gender in Counseling and Psychotherapy
3 credits

This course examines how ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and other cultural factors influence psychological experience, expectations for therapy and the therapeutic relationship. Emphasis will be on developing a fuller appreciation for the complexities of cultural factors both in students’ own lives and those of persons from different backgrounds.
GRCP 536 Psychological Assessment  

3 credits An introduction to psychological testing and measurement. Reviews instruments used to assess intelligence, achievement, and personality, including the: Wechsler Intelligence Scales, the Bender-Gestalt, Wide-Range Achievement Test, MMPI-2, the Rorschach and Thematic Apperception Test. The student will obtain hands-on experience in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of psychological tests. Prerequisite: GRCP 503
GRCP 540 Drugs and Their Use with a Clinical Population  

3 credits Introduces the student to the various types of psychoactive drugs used with different clinical populations. An overview of how these drugs work as well as their effects on the person will be presented.
GRCP 542 Career Development and Counseling  

3 credits An overview of career development theory with a focus on clinical application. This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of career development through the lifespan, apply career counseling techniques, gain exposure to career assessment inventories, identify career information resources, implement career education programs, and address legal and ethical issues related to employment.
GRCP 544 Eating Disorders  

3 credits Surveys the psychoanalytic, systemic, and behavioral explanations for a variety of eating disorders. Discusses treatment of anorexics, bulimics, and compulsive overeaters. Uses videos to show treatment approaches.
GRCP 546 Bereavement Counseling  

3 credits Introduces the student to the theory and practice of therapeutic intervention for bereavement and grieving. Developmental issues will be discussed as they relate to the bereavement process.
GRCP 602 Play Therapy  

3 credits This course provides an introduction to the major theories and techniques of play therapy as it is used to address a wide variety of clinical problems, in both individual and family settings. Classes include: lecture, class discussion, exploration of materials, practice of techniques, and viewing of videotape presentations by current leaders in the field. Prerequisite: GRCP 500. Prior completion of GRCP 514 recommended but not required.
GRCP 604 A Systemic Approach to the Problems of Adolescents  

3 credits Reviews normal adolescent development and the psychological and psychosocial problems commonly experienced during this phase of life. Problems to be discussed will include: delinquency, drug abuse, violence, eating disorders, depression, and suicide. Though a variety of approaches will be considered, the family systems model will be emphasized. Prior completion of GRCP 608 recommended but not required.
GRCP 608 Marriage and Family Therapy  

3 credits
Introduces the student to the field of family therapy and systems thinking. Material covered will span the entire history of family therapy, from the early movement in Palo Alto and Philadelphia, to Bowen, Satir, the Milan Team, strategic, and narrative models. Although this course is primarily oriented to studying theory, some basic practice issues are discussed. Video used.
GRCP 612 Advanced Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy  

3 credits In-depth analysis of major family theories selected from those reviewed in GRCP 608 (Marriage and Family Therapy). Models will be selected from the following: Bowenian, Structural, Strategic, Milan, and Narrative. Students will read original texts and critically examine the views taken by proponents of each theory. Video used. Prerequisite: GRCP 608
GRCP 614 Marriage and Family Therapy Techniques  

3 credits Introduces the skills necessary to begin clinical work with a family or couple. All aspects of treatment will be explored and practiced by the students. Videotapes will be produced by the student. Prerequisites: GRCP 608 and 612
GRCP 615 Special Topics in Child and Adolescent Therapy  

3 credits (Title of the course will be included on transcript)
GRCP 616 Advanced Marriage and Family Therapy Techniques  

3 credits Uses family role-play to examine the therapeutic techniques best suited to the situations presented by that family. Each student will be videotaped in the role of therapist for a role-play family. The student’s therapeutic style and skill will be critiqued by the class and instructor. Students will also role-play a family member for an extended period in order to understand the experience of being a client. Didactic lectures will cover advanced techniques with stepfamilies, child-problem families, and families with addiction. Prerequisites: GRCP 608, 612, and 614
GRCP 618 Human Sexuality and Marriage  

3 credits
Introduction to a theoretical understanding of the physiological and developmental stages of human sexuality. Taking a thorough sex history and addressing some sexual dysfunctions will be included. Working with couples in conjoint therapy will also be emphasized.
GRCP 622 Introduction to the Assessment & Treatment of Psychological Trauma  

3 credits
This course covers: the history of the study of trauma; current knowledge regarding the physiological, biochemical, neurological, psychological and interpersonal sequelae of trauma; trauma and memory; incidence and prevalence of trauma in various populations; protective factors; and specialized treatment techniques.
GRCP 624 Treatment of Complex Chronic Trauma Responses  

3 credits
This course develops skills in assessing and treating complex trauma responses arising from repeated and/or long-term toxic experience. Course content includes: the effects of chronic trauma on development; diagnostic dilemmas; establishing safety in and out of the therapeutic relationship; responding to self-injurious attempts at self-soothing; working with dissociative states; pacing the processing of traumatic material; challenges to the therapeutic relationship; and therapist self-care and self-awareness. Prerequisite: GRCP 622.
GRCP 626 Acute Incident Responding:
Trauma Prevention and Early Intervention Strategies
 

3 credits
This skill focuses on the assessment, intervention, relationship, consulting, and collaboration skills needed to prevent or minimize trauma responses in individuals and groups immediately following personal or community-wide catastrophic events. Prerequisite: GRCP 622
 

GRCP 628 Working Effectively in Trauma-Intensive Communities  

3 credits This course focuses on the assessment, intervention, consulting, and collaboration skills needed to work effectively both in environments that tend to engender trauma responses (e.g., drug or gang-infested neighborhoods, war zones, prisons) and in environments in which a large portion of the population is suffering from trauma responses (e.g., shelters, prisons, refugee camps, the foster care system, residential treatment settings). Prerequisite: GRCP 622
 

GRCP 630 Foundations of Addictive Behaviors  

3 credits Surveys theories and research in the field of addiction. Covers substance abuse as well as models of addiction applied to eating disorders, gambling, and sexual promiscuity.
 

GRCP 632 Treatment Approaches to Substance Abuse  

3 credits Surveys treatment intervention models and philosophies for treating substance-abusing clients. Models discussed include: individual, group, family, and therapeutic communities; Alcoholics Anonymous; residential treatment; outpatient approaches and comparative theories. Aims to help the therapist distinguish among therapeutic approaches and to determine appropriate treatment selections for various case situations. Prerequisite: GRCP 630 or permission of department Chair.
 

GRCP 634 Spirituality of the Twelve Steps  

3 credits
Addresses spirituality as a key aspect of the twelve-step recovery program.
 

GRCP 636 Special Topics in Addictions  

3 credits
(Title of the course will be included on transcript)
 

GRCP 638 Systemic Treatment of Addictions  

3 credits Covers the topic of understanding and treating the family affected by the presence of addicted members. Research and treatment options will be discussed.
 

GRCP 640 Introduction to Forensic Treatment  

3 credits Introduces students to the field of forensic psychology, its history and impact on today’s world. The focus is on the relationship between law and psychology, the mental health system, mental illness and criminal conduct, and the role of the mental health professional within the criminal justice system. Offered at the DeSales campus only.
 

GRCP 642 Treatment of Juvenile Offenders  

3 credits Addresses the psychological factors leading to the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency. Reviews the major psychological treatment approaches, with relevant case studies presented for illustrative detail. Analyzes legal and institutional responses to juvenile crime from the perspective of learning theory and developmental psychology. Discusses the roles of the mental health professional in the juvenile justice system. Offered at the DeSales campus only.
 

GRCP 644 Treatment of Adult Offenders  

3 credits Examines psychological origins and dynamics of criminal behavior from the viewpoint of psychological theories. Treatment of the different types of offender populations (antisocial personality, female offenders, sex offenders, etc.) within the criminal justice system will also be discussed. Explores psychological theories related to the etiology, development and prediction of violent crime, and types of intervention possible within the criminal justice setting. Offered at the DeSales campus only.
 

GRCP 645 Special Topics  

3 credits (Title of the course will be included on transcript)
 

GRCP 646 Forensic Interviewing and Assessment Techniques  

3 credits Survey of the use of psychological assessment instruments in the forensic realm. Assessment of competency, insanity, predicting dangerousness, sexual assault and domestic violence will be among the topics reviewed. Note this course will not prepare students to administer forensic assessments as this is typically a doctoral-level function. Prerequisite GRCP 536. Offered at the DeSales campus only.
 

GRCP 705 Practicum  

3 credits This course requires at least 100 hours of on-site experience. It will provide the opportunity for students to develop proficiency in diagnosing various mental disorders on the basis of a comprehensive diagnostic interview. Students will also be trained in developing treatment plans and strategies appropriate to particular diagnoses. Opportunities will also be provided for students to gain exposure in different therapeutic environments in which they will observe and assist in various therapeutic modalities. Students are also required to attend a weekly group supervision seminar. Prerequisites: GRCP 500, 503, 506 and 512

GRCP 715, 725, 735 Internship  

3 credits each term This is a field placement designed to provide students with supervised experience conducting counseling and psychotherapy. There are four options for completion of internship based upon a student’s needs and goals. Students who want to obtain LPC licensure have two choices. These students can complete the minimum 600 hours of internship in either two or three consecutive terms. Students who want to obtain MFT licensure need to complete the minimum 300 hours of direct client contact over a period of a full calendar year, which would be three consecutive terms of internship. Students are required to attend a weekly group supervision seminar on campus throughout each term in which they are enrolled in Internship. Prerequisites: Thirty (30) total credits including: GRCP 500, 503, 506, 508, 512, 705 (except for MFT students) and two concentration courses.
 

GRCP 745 Clinical Experience I  

3 credits This course is identical to GRCP 705. Enrollment is open only to students in the M.S./Psy.D. track.

GRCP 755 Clinical Experience II  

3 credits Enrollment is open only to students in the M.S./Psy.D. track. This is a field placement designed to provide students with supervised experience conducting counseling and psychotherapy. Students must complete a minimum of 600 hours over two terms. Students are required to attend a weekly group supervision seminar on campus. Prerequisites: Thirty (30) total credits including: GRCP 500, 503, 506, 508, 512, 745 and two elective courses.

GRCP 765 Clinical Experience III  

3 credits Continuation of GRCP 755. Enrollment is open only to students in the M.S./Psy.D. track.

 

NOTE: Courses at the 800 level & above are open only to students in the Psy.D. program.

GRCP 800 Psychological Assessment I 

3 credits This course will prepare students to administer and interpret the current edition of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults, the MMPI-2, and MMPI-A. Basic principles of measurement (standardization, reliability, validity) will be reviewed.
 

GRCP 801 Personality and Individual Differences  

3 credits This course reviews and analyzes the major theories of personality including psychoanalytic, neo-analytic, humanistic, behavioral, social-cognitive, trait and evolutionary approaches. In addition to learning the major theories, students will read original works from each theorist. The course also establishes a foundation for the assessment of personality. Individual differences will be further explored through a series of narrative studies of lives in transition.

GRCP 801L Personality and Individual Differences Lab  

1 credit This laboratory course will match the syllabus for GRCP 801, Personality and Individual Differences, in terms of readings and examinations. The primary goal of the course is to learn the basic therapeutic strategies relevant to the personality theories presented in the main lecture (GRCP 801) and understand the connection between the theory of personality and the therapeutic approaches that evolve out of that theory.

GRCP 802 Psychological Assessment II  

3 credits This course will prepare students to conduct cognitive assessments of elementary school children and adolescents using current editions of the following tests: Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children; Wechsler Individual Achievement Test; Wechsler Memory Scale; Children’s Memory Scale; Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning; Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test; and Beery Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI). Students will also learn about parent/teacher rating scales and child self-report measures. Students will be introduced to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence. Prerequisite: GRCP 800
 

GRCP 804 Historical Foundations of Psychology  

3 credits This course provides the student with an historical overview of the history and systems of psychology from ancient to modern times. All major systems of thought will be reviewed. This course also examines the current systems of understanding human function including research into memory, cognition and affect, with which the modern clinician needs to be familiar. Ties are made between historical systems and current systems of understanding. Finally, the course connects all these systems of thought with the psychodynamic and systems orientations that underlie the philosophy of the Department of Professional Psychology at Chestnut Hill College.
 

GRCP 806 Modern & Historic Psychodynamic Principles  

3 credits This course examines the principles of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic thought and therapy from Freud to the present. Classic psychoanalytic approaches through modern object relations, ego-psychology, and self-psychology paradigms will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on applying the principles to the actual practice of psychodynamic psychotherapy: Freud, neo-Freudians, object-relations, ego-psychology and self-psychology, and the implications for the therapeutic relationship. An in-depth critique of how psychodynamic principles coexist in the midst of the modern clinical milieu will be accomplished.
 

GRCP 806L Modern & Historic Psychodynamic Principles Lab  

1 credit One-hour lab per week to be taken in conjunction with Modern & Historic Psychodynamic Principles. The lab is specifically designed to provide the student with the opportunity for clinical application of the material learned in Modern & Historic Psychodynamic Principles.
 

GRCP 808 Family Therapy  

3 credits This course reviews the theories and techniques associated with the major models of contemporary family therapy, including Structural, Strategic, Bowenian, Contextual and Narrative Models. Videotapes illustrating family therapy interventions will be shown. Students will learn how to conduct an assessment of a family and develop treatment plans based on their assessment. Methods of working with distressed couples are also covered.
 

GRCP 808L Family Therapy Lab  

1 credit Each student will be required to be both part of a Created Family, and serve as the therapist for another family in the class. These sessions will be supervised live, and videotaped. The videotaped session will be analyzed to ensure that students are learning best practices in family therapy.
 

GRCP 810 Biological Bases of Behavior  

3 credits This course focuses on the biological and physiological processes underlying human behavior. All physiological systems of the human organism will be reviewed as they affect behavior. Focused topic areas include: the brain, the nervous system, the endocrine system, physiological responses to stress, organic disorders or organically predisposed disorders, and physiological bases for personality traits.
 

GRCP 812 Psychopharmacology  

3 credits This course presents an overview of the use of pharmacological interventions in a psychopathological population. Specific drugs, mechanism of actions, treatment dosages, toxicity, and possible abuse are reviewed. In addition, the role of neurotransmitters, receptor sites and other biochemical processes within the brain and other organs are taught. Current drugs within the following topic areas will be presented: antipsychotic agents (neuroleptics), lithium salts, antidepressant agents, anti-anxiety agents, and psychomotor stimulants. Prerequisite: GRCP 810

 
GRCP 815 Evidence-Based Therapies: Research, Theory and Practice
3 credits
This course introduces students to Evidence-Based Therapies (EBT) and addresses the importance of EBT’s to the practice of psychology. The course examines the research process used to determine what constitutes an evidence-based treatment. In addition to examining particular models, the course also examines those aspects of the therapist/client relationship that have been supported by research. Particular EBT’s addressed in this course include Psychodynamic Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, parent-child interaction therapy, Family Therapy, Emotionally-Focused Couples Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and interpersonal therapy. Particular attention is paid to evidence-based brief therapy models.

GRCP 816 Advanced Topics in Human Diversity  

3 credits This course continues to explore issues of culture and gender in psychology and psychotherapy introduced in GRCP 532 (The Role of Culture and Gender in Counseling and Psychotherapy). Topics addressed will include: developmental theories of identity; ethical dimensions of multicultural competency; awareness of personal bias and its impact on professional relationships; the study of diverse family structures; and the effects of poverty.

GRCP 818 Statistical Applications  

3 credits
This course takes an applied approach to the use of statistics in conducting empirical research. Fundamentals of research design, statistical analysis and computer software will be taught. Specific areas include: 1) research design; 2) data collection formats; 3) statistical analysis; and 4) statistics software packages.
 

GRCP 820 Advanced Seminar in Techniques of Therapy  

3 credits This seminar allows students to explore and develop expertise in current and advanced techniques in psychotherapy. A base of information and skill development in implementing the therapeutic relationship will be provided. Students will build upon this base by developing specialized skills in their areas of interest. Emphasis throughout the seminar will be on the healing and facilitative aspects of the therapeutic relationship. The base of information provided by the professor will include: 1) relational issues; 2) engagement; 3) the therapeutic alliance; 4) resolving confrontation; and 5) termination.
 

GRCP 820L Advanced Seminar in Techniques of Therapy Lab  

1 credit One-hour per week lab to be taken in conjunction with Advanced Seminar in Techniques of Therapy. The lab is specifically designed to provide the student with the opportunity for clinical application of the material learned in Advanced Seminar in Techniques of Therapy.

 
GRCP 824 Professional Practice Issues in Psychology  

3 credits This course will help the student to develop career management skills as a professional psychologist. Based on the principles of ethical practice and professional conduct, the student will be exposed to: 1) legal issues; 2) insurance reimbursement; and 3) the business of psychology.
 

GRCP 828 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior  

3 credits  

This course will examine cognitive psychological processes, such as learning, motivation, sensation, information processing and perception. This study of cognitive science is reviewed to better understand the cognitive-affective-behavioral-personality interaction.
 

GRCP 829 Supervision and Consultation  

3 credits This course is designed to help students become knowledgeable about the role of supervision in the training of clinical psychologists. Specifically, the course examines definitions of supervision, the supervisory relationship, models of supervision, the function of evaluation, supervision teaching formats and interventions, current research, legal and ethical issues, and the impact of the following issues on supervision: gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, social class, and other cultural issues. A distinction between supervision and consultation is made. Although consultation may involve similar skills as supervision, differences in function, role and responsibility are discussed.
 

GRCP 836 Dissertation Seminar  

3 credits This course focuses on the articulation of the student’s dissertation question(s) and hypotheses, and the development of the dissertation proposal, which consists of the first two chapters of the dissertation (literature review and methods). The student works with the seminar instructor while keeping the dissertation chair involved in the proposal’s progress. The course will also review the procedure for submitting an application to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for research involving human participants.
 

GRCP 838 Social Bases of Behavior  

3 credits This course presents students with the study of factors that influence the behavior of individuals and groups in predictable ways. It provides a strong grounding in the traditional and emerging concerns of social psychology, including: group dynamics, social cognitions, cognitive dissonance stereotypes and prejudice, interpersonal relationships and attractions, attribution theory, self-justification and self-understanding, aggression, conformity, persuasion techniques, and conflict resolution. Students will also be presented with ways in which these social psychology factors influence and can serve as resources for their clinical work.
 

GRCP 844, 845, 846 Dissertation Mentoring I, II, III  

1 credit each term A mentoring group is comprised of seven to ten students and a full-time faculty member meeting weekly. The group will meet for an hour each week for three consecutive terms. The purpose of the class is to help students identify a dissertation topic and begin preparation of the literature review. The course culminates in a poster session and a completed concept paper that summarizes the literature review and describes the plan for the dissertation.
 

GRCP 852 Treating the Diverse Family  

3 credits
This course examines the clinical issues that confront "diverse" families, such as divorced and/or remarried families, gay and lesbian couples and families, inter-racial families, families with adopted children, grandparent-headed families, and foster families. This course will prepare students to work effectively with non-traditional families and will encourage the student to examine how his/her own personal values might affect his/her clinical work with these groups. Live supervision and videotaping will be used for training purposes.
 

GRCP 855 Family Therapy with Young Children  

3 credits
This course examines the treatment of children seen in family therapy. In order to treat young children, it is necessary for the psychologist to function as assessor, therapist, and network consultant. An understanding of how to proceed with a variety of childhood disorders will be covered. Consultations with school districts, physicians, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and teachers will serve as an adjunct to the specific clinical interventions that are recommended for this population. Developmental issues will be explored, as will basic principles of working with children and parents.
 

GRCP 859 Seminar in Family Therapy  

3 credits
This is an advanced family therapy course covering special topics, clinical issues, and techniques of intervention. This course revisits the primary theoretical models of treatment and examines how the field has evolved.

GRCP 861 Psychological Assessment III: Projective Testing  

3 credits
This course will prepare students to administer and interpret projective tests. Emphasis will be placed on learning the scoring and interpretation of the Rorschach Inkblot Technique according to John Exner’s Comprehensive System. Prerequisite: GRCP 800

 
GRCP 863 Advanced Personality Assessment  

3 credits
This course assumes a working knowledge of the Rorschach (Comprehensive System) and MMPI-2 and will cover more advanced topics in interpreting and integrating these two instruments. Students will also be trained in the use of the Millon inventories, the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), and NEO-PI-R. Prerequisites: GRCP 800, 861
 

GRCP 864 Advanced Cognitive Assessment  

3 credits This course is an advanced course in cognitive assessment of children and adults. The course builds upon the introduction to cognitive assessment in Psychological Assessment I and II and upon the student’s experiences conducting assessments during the practicum. Topics covered in this course will include: formulating the assessment plan to respond to the referral questions; advanced interpretation of the WISC-IV and WISC-IV integrated; use of the WISC-IV with special populations; early childhood assessment; cross-battery assessment; and conducting effective feedback sessions. Prerequisites: GRCP 800, 802, 901, 903 and 904

 
GRCP 869 Neuropsychological Assessment  

3 credits
This course will introduce the student to methods for assessing the presence and extent of cognitive deficits associated with organic cerebral dysfunction. Students will be trained to utilize the Halstead-Reitan and Luria-Nebraska batteries. Prerequisites: GRCP 800, 802 and 810

 
GRCP 871 Directed Teaching in Psychology  

1 credit
Students will teach master’s-level or undergraduate courses under the mentorship of a faculty member. This course cannot be used to meet credit requirements for the Psy.D. degree and may be taken only with written approval from the Chair.

GRCP 901, 903 and 904 Practicum I  

1.5 credits each term
The practicum will focus primarily on psychological assessment, including testing and report writing. Students complete a minimum of 12 hours per week at the practicum site for three terms. An on-campus seminar is a required part of the practicum.

 
GRCP 905, 906 and 907 Practicum II  

1.5 credits each term
This three-term field placement is designed to provide supervised clinical experience. A wide variety of clinical sites are available to allow the student a choice of the clinical population to be served. In addition to working a minimum of 12 hours per week at the field site, students are required to attend a weekly seminar on campus.

GRCP 914 Dissertation Advising  

2 credits each term
Students are required to register for Dissertation Advising (2 credits) beginning with the term following the completion of GRCP 836 (Dissertation Seminar) and continuing until the dissertation has been successfully defended. During this time, students will consult with their advisors and other members of the committee regarding the progress of the dissertation and any problems that may arise.

GRCP 950, 951 and 952 Internship I  

1 credit each term
20 hours per week at an internship site for one full calendar year. Students completing a full-time internship (40 hours per week) take this course concurrently with Internship II.

 
GRCP 960, 961 and 962 Internship II  

1 credit each term
20 hours per week at an internship site for one full calendar year. Students completing a full-time internship (40 hours per week) take this course concurrently with Internship I.