GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

 

Coordinator: Ralph E. Swan, Ph.D. 

Master of Science in Instructional Technology  

o   Education and Technology Specialization 

o   Instructional Design for E-Learning Specialization 

o   ITS Specialization 

·         Master of Science in Instructional Technology – Five Year Program 

·         Certificate of Advanced Study in Instructional Technology  

·         Certificate of Professional Development in Instructional Technology 

PROGRAM SPECIALIZATIONS 

The Instructional Technology specializations are designed to meet the varied capabilities, needs and goals of today’s wide range of instructional technology professionals. All specializations share a common core of courses as well as a common philosophy. This common philosophy is grounded in literature addressing learning, technology, and culture. It places value on the reflective nature of learning, the need for each learner to construct unique meaning and the process of building learning communities. The common core of courses provides the theoretical understanding of instructional technology and hands-on experience with state-of-the-art hardware and professional level software. 

 

COURSE STRUCTURE 

Instructional Technology offers blended courses, a combination of online participation and on site class meetings that provide students with the advantages of distance education without sacrificing the richness of a face-to-face learning experience. 

Students applying for entrance into Instructional Technology are expected to plan for this aspect of the program. Attendance at each of the face-to-face meetings is a strict requirement for every course. Assignments are frequently submitted online and may be due as early as the first face-to-face meeting. Instructional Technology provides a Jump Start date by which students and instructors will be expected to communicate regarding course information and possible assignments. The number and length of face-to-face class meetings are determined by the nature of each course.  Typically, a course with a hands-on focus may meet as many as ten (10) times while courses with a more theoretical focus may meet one (1) to five (5) times. Courses also include virtual meetings for which students will be required to make time in their personal schedules but for which travel to campus or another learning site is not necessary. 

Guidelines for Participation 

Students are encouraged to register early in the time frame provided by the School of Graduate Studies. Students new to the program will need to provide an email address after which they will be assigned a username. Once the username has been assigned students are expected to gain access to Blackboard at chc.blackboard.com following password instructions that will have been provided. On the Instructional Technology site within Blackboard students will initially access partial syllabi for their courses that may include initial course assignments. Current partial syllabi will be posted by the Jump Start date announced on Blackboard. Separate Blackboard sites devoted solely to individual courses with a full syllabus and detailed information may become available at a later time. Student participation in online activities, including a discussion board, is required in all courses and forms a part of the final course grade. 

  

Guided Individualized Courses 

A possible student option in Instructional Technology is the Guided Individualized Course (GIC). The GIC accommodates students’ need for academic self-sufficiency in meeting targeted goals requiring an independent path of study. It is a special form of an independent course in which the student works under the guidance of a professor to achieve program-related goals. Advance approval from the Coordinator of the Instructional Technology Program is required.  

 

Master of Science in instructional Technology  

Program Requirements 

All specializations require that students attain a certain level of sophistication in the following areas of study: 

     Use of appropriate technology as a tool in achieving professional goals 

     Analysis of current theories specific to the disciplines of the specialization 

     Evaluation of the effects of technology on cultures and contexts 

  

Courses 

All students entering the Instructional Technology Program are expected to have a certain facility in using technology including simple operation of a computer, familiarity with word processing, and the ability to use the Internet. Additionally, to establish that students have the required background for a specialization, specific prerequisite courses may be required. In addition to the core of courses common to the Program, each specialization includes a common core of courses as well. Elective courses may also be provided. The Master of Science in Instructional Technology requires thirty-six (36) credit hours. 

Research 

As part of meeting criteria for coursework and completing the required number of credits, each student designs, conducts and completes a research project as the final requirement for graduation. The project is normally completed as part of the course GRIT 791 Seminar in Instructional Technology. It is judged as complete when it has been presented in scholarly written format. A student who has not completed the study during Seminar in Instructional Technology registers for GRIT 795 Thesis Guidance each term and session until its completion. The study cannot be held in abeyance for more than two years. 

EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY specialization 

The Education and Technology specialization is designed for the teacher eager to develop the technical skills and conceptual framework necessary for the appropriate use of technology as a tool in the learning environment. The candidate for this specialization emerges from the program with newly developed leadership skills, expertise in the use of state-of-the-art technologies in the classroom and a renewed understanding of the role technology can play in transforming the classroom into a learning community.  Throughout their coursework students are encouraged to develop their potential as leaders by presenting at professional meetings, and possibly publishing the required research project.  

  

Course Requirements 

Candidates for the degree with an Education and Technology specialization complete thirty-six (36) credit hours of coursework including the required courses listed below. 

Common Core (18 credit hours) 

GRIT 541 Video Communications  

GRIT 598 Scientific Inquiry: Tools for Research 

GRIT 651 Technology-Based Learning Environments 

GRIT 699 Image Processing in Multimedia Design 

GRIT 791 Seminar in Instructional Technology 

GRIT 798 Ethical Leadership and the Future 

Education and Technology Core (12 credit hours) 

GRIT 550  Emerging Technology Trends in Classrooms and Corporations 

GRIT 593 Web Connections 

GRIT 654 Cognition and Accessible Technologies 

GRIT 661Introduction to Studio TV 

  

Two Electives (6 credit hours) 

Instructional technology specialist (ITS) Specialization 

The Instructional Technology Specialist specialization is for students planning to become Instructional Technology Specialists in Pennsylvania schools. This specialization prepares students to advise and lead at the building or district level. Students taking this specialization are given the opportunity to expand understanding of instructional technology through theoretical and project-oriented study. It addresses legal and ethical issues, leadership, technology planning, and other practical aspects of the role of the Instructional Technology Specialist. Students interact with guest lecturers who share informed academic and practical knowledge, receive supervision through field experience, and obtain guidance in the compilation, presentation and defense of a professional portfolio. 

Course Requirements 

Candidates for the degree with an ITS specialization complete thirty-six (36) credit hours of coursework including the required courses listed below. 

Five Common Core Courses (15 credit hours) 

GRIT 541 Video Communications 

GRIT 598 Scientific Inquiry: Tools for Research 

GRIT 699 Image Processing in Multimedia Design 

GRIT 791 Seminar in Instructional Technology 

GRIT 798 Ethical Leadership and the Future  

  

·         ITS Core (18 credit hours) 

GRIT 551 Networking Organizations 

GRIT 593 Web Connections 

GRIT 654 Cognition and Accessible Technologies 

GRIT 685 Technology Planning 

GRIT 687 Technology and the Administrator 

GRIT 701 Practicum and Portfolio (1 credit) 

GRIT 702 Practicum and Portfolio Presentation (2 credits) 

  

One Elective (3 credit hours) 

  

In this specialization only, GRIT 685 Technology Planning replaces the common core course 651 Technology-Based Learning Environments. 

  

Students who graduate with a Master of Science Degree with an ITS specialization become ITS certification candidates. Candidates who successfully complete the ITS Certification Interview become certified as Pennsylvania Department of Education Instructional Technology Specialists (ITS).    

  

instructional design for e-learning specialization 

The Instructional Design for E-Learning specialization provides instructional technology professionals with the means to effectively utilize state-of-the-art technologies in the development of learning experiences throughout a broad array of contexts. This facility with technology is enhanced by an emphasis on collaboration, community building and a global perspective. The Instructional Design for E-Learning specialization focuses on the development of visionary leaders capable of understanding the effects of technology in rapidly evolving cultures and contexts.  Students may be encouraged to design instruction to meet context specific needs within the school or workplace, to present at conferences, or to publish the results of conducted research. 

  

Course Requirements 

This specialization requires the completion of thirty-six (36) credit hours including the required courses listed below. 

Prerequisite 

GRIT 593 Web Connections 

  

Common Core (18 credit hours) 

GRIT 541 Video Communications 

GRIT 598 Scientific Inquiry: Tools for Research 

GRIT 651 Technology-Based Learning Environments 

GRIT 699 Image Processing in Multimedia Design 

GRIT 791 Seminar in Instructional Technology 

GRIT 798 Ethical Leadership and the Future 

·      Instructional Design for E-Learning Core (12 credit hours) 

GRIT 645 Introduction to Online Learning 

GRIT 671 Principles of Instructional Design 

GRIT 700 Technology Integration in Multimedia Development 

GRIT 738 Intelligences: From Games to Creative Genius 

  

Two Electives (6 credit hours) 

  

Master of Science in Instructional Technology – Five Year Program 

In conjunction with the School of Undergraduate Studies at Chestnut Hill College, the Instructional Technology Program offers qualified undergraduate students the chance to complete both a bachelor’s degree and a Master of Science in Instructional Technology within a five-year period. The Five Year Program includes specific course requirements and qualifying levels of student performance. 

  

CertificateS of Advanced Study in instructional Technology (CAS) 

The Certificate of Advanced Study program is open to applicants who have a master’s degree and are seeking to enrich their professional portfolios with current technology-related skills and understandings. We offer this certificate with specializations in Education and Technology, ITS Certification, and Instructional design for E-learning. 

The candidate for the CAS completes eighteen (18) credit hours in Instructional Technology with the course requirements as designated for each specialization. If a required course is waived because of previous coursework or experience, the candidate registers for an alternate course.  

Prerequisites 

Prerequisites for a Certificate of Advanced Study are the same as those for the master’s degree in the selected specialization. 

  

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED STUDY IN EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY 

Course Requirements 

The certificate candidate completes a total of eighteen (18) credit hours with the distribution listed below. Certificate candidates take four (4) required courses as indicated below. They are given an opportunity to pursue their professional interests in their studies with a choice of two elective courses. 

Required Courses (12 credit hours) 

GRIT 541 Video Communications 

GRIT 550 Emerging Technology Trends in Classrooms and Corporations 

GRIT 593  Web Connections 

GRIT 651 Technology-Based Learning Environments 

Two Electives (6 credit hours) 

Certificate candidates choose two (2) additional courses selected from the Instructional Technology course list. 

  

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED STUDY for INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST (ITS) certification 

For students with a master’s degree in instructional technology or its equivalent who are seeking ITS certification the CAS for ITS certification provides a means to achieve that goal. Depending upon the student’s experience and previous coursework, other options for becoming an ITS candidate may be available as well.  

  

Course Requirements 

The certificate candidate completes a total of eighteen (18) credit hours with the distribution listed below. Certificate candidates take the six (6) required courses as indicated below.  

Required Courses (18 credit hours) 

GRIT 551 Networking Organizations 

GRIT 685 Technology Planning 

GRIT 687 Technology and the Administrator   

GRIT 708 Ethical Leadership and the Future 

GRIT 701  Practicum and Portfolio (1 credit) 

GRIT 702  Practicum and Portfolio Presentation (2 credits) 

One Elective (3 credit hours) 

  

As with the Master of Science Degree in Instructional Technology, students with the CAS for ITS certification become ITS certification candidates. Candidates who successfully complete the ITS Certification Interview become certified as Pennsylvania Department of Education Instructional Technology Specialists (ITS).    

  

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED STUDY IN INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR E-LEARNING 

Course Requirements 

The certificate candidate completes a total of eighteen (18) credit hours with the distribution listed below. Certificate candidates take four (4) required courses as indicated below. They are given an opportunity to pursue their professional interests in their studies with a choice of two elective courses. 

·      Required Courses (12 credit hours) 

GRIT 541 Video Communications 

GRIT 671 Principles of Instructional Design 

GRIT 699 Image Processing in Multimedia Design 

GRIT 700 Technology Integration in Multimedia Development 

·      Two Electives (6 credit hours) 

Certificate candidates choose two (2) additional courses selected from the Instructional Technology course list. 

Certificates of Professional Development 

Persons who have successfully completed a bachelor’s degree at an accredited institution of higher learning are welcomed into our professional development certificate program. It is a program designed for the professional who wishes to acquire expertise in instructional technology for a specific area of study. Each certificate requires the completion of twelve (12) credit hours or four (4) courses with three (3) of the courses required and the fourth an elective, thus giving the candidate the opportunity to complete the certificate requirement with an elective that best brings the experience to closure for the individual person. 

  

Course Descriptions 

GRIT 541 Video Communications   

3 credits 

This course surveys a fast-changing technology that has had immeasurable impact on communications, education, business and entertainment. Digital technology and increasing computer power have enabled sound and video to be manipulated much the same as graphics and text to create an explosion of multimedia materials. The course provides an historical perspective of video communications, giving the student practical experience with video tools. Class assignments are shared, either electronically with classmates and instructor or through cooperative planning and/or construction of video projects. 

 

GRIT 550 Emerging Technology Trends in Classrooms and Corporations 

3 credits 

This class provides an introduction to emerging technology trends and how classrooms and corporations are using these technologies and trends to further their missions and goals.  Participants will actively research and write in order to gain:  an understanding of new technologies in schools and corporations; an overview of new learners/workers; and an understanding of current thinking and learning theories. 

  

GRIT 551 Networking Organizations  

3 credits  

Students investigate the basic concepts of networking technology, the problems and promise of online communications for the business, service, community, and educational environments, and related research. They design a networking configuration with hardware and software specifications, cost estimates, and probable impact on the environment for which it is designed. They research appropriate networks for specific constituencies. Readings address the ethical issues inherent in the networking of an organization. 

 

GRIT 593 Web Connections    

3 credits  

This is an introduction to web design and development.  Students plan, design and construct an interactive, multimedia website relevant to their personal or professional interest using HTML and Macromedia Dreamweaver. They demonstrate an understanding of web design and usability principles by applying them to the design of their website. Prerequisites: GRIT 550 or GRED 615 

 

GRIT 598 Scientific Inquiry: Tools for Research   

3 credits 

This course focuses on epistemological issues and examines the basic elements inherent in the design and execution of re­search. Its overall purpose is to introduce the student to the nature of knowledge and the process of conducting educational research and its attendant methodological and ethical issues. Students develop a problem statement, review the literature, and begin to create a research design for their research projects. 

 

GRIT 645 Introduction to Online Learning      

3 credits  

The purpose of this course is to guide educators and trainers in the formulation of norms and guidelines for interactive online communications in collaborative, problem-solving modes. Topics include: the integrity of an academic online program, alternative delivery systems, administrative and technology requirements, faculty development, and program evaluation. Students research the literature on effective online instructional programs and work in teams to design a program for a given population. 

  

GRIT 651 Technology-Based Learning Environments    

3 credits 

The focus of this course is on the development and evaluation of a constructivist technology-based, project-driven environment.  Students design and implement a plan for transforming an aspect of a learning environment. In evaluating their project they utilize observations, journals, and other data-collection strategies. They bring their project to closure with a written report on their research as well as an in-class presentation of the experience. (Summer only) 

 

GRIT 654 Cognition and Accessible Technologies    

3 credits  

Students examine the fundamentals of technology-based learning and gain comprehensive understanding of technologies accessible to novice and non-technology-oriented practitioners. Course emphasis is on an understanding of the learning process and the planning and evaluation of activities that utilize these accessible technologies effectively. The course culminates with the creation of learning projects relevant to students’ current or prospective roles in instructional technology. 

 

GRIT 661 Studio TV: Introduction    

3 credits 

Students script and direct a studio interview using production techniques, such as camera operation, lighting, graphics, audio, and staging components of a state-of-the-art studio production. The class is application-based and students work in teams to plan and develop short quality TV presentations. They are required to participate in all productions and critically evaluate their final projects. Prerequisite: GRIT 541 (Spring only) 

 

GRIT 671 Principles of Instructional Design  

3 credits 

Project management and basic skills in instructional design and development are covered in this course.  Student design projects will show evidence of understanding of needs assessment, competent determination of instructional content, accurate identification of learner characteristics and effective instructional strategies.  Class activities include extensive collaboration and adequate reflection on situations for which learning or other solutions may be required. (Specifically designed for Instructional Design for E-Learning specialization) 

  

GRIT 680 Rise of Global Communities   

3 credits  

The emergence of new information and communications technologies is changing the fabric of our society, reshaping how we work and participate as citizens in a growing global community. In this changing world, the boundary of local and global community becomes blurred. While in diverse settings, those who embark on global interventions find themselves crossing global boundaries. This course will examine the implications of these changes for embarking on global interventions that result in the development of global communities. (Summer only) 

 

GRIT 685 Technology Planning  

3 credits 

Designed for the student intending to acquire ITS certification, this course prepares students to construct a comprehensive technology plan as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education at the building and district level. Learning is project oriented as students engage in the process of constructing such a plan in an actual or hypothetical school and district and interact with technology administrators in area schools. Other leadership and administrative skills are developed as well. (Specifically designed for ITS specialization) 

 

GRIT 687 Technology and the Administrator    

3 credits 

This group-oriented course emphasizes the use of technology in school administration and examines the role of the administrator as a technological leader. Students work individually and as a team to research, analyze, and synthesize current topics including technology planning, group processes, leadership, and legal and ethical issues. 

 

GRIT 690 Emerging Technologies: Evaluation and Implementation  

3 credits  

This course serves two distinct but related purposes: to examine the history of curriculum and instruction in the United States and to formalize a research project on current technology-rich environments. The student completes the following sections of the required research project: introduction, design of the study, data collection, and data analysis. With their readings on the history of curriculum and the results of their research on current practice, students write a short paper on future orientations of learning. Thus, they have analyzed curriculum and learning through three lenses: the past, the present, and potential futures. Prerequisites: GRIT 550 or GRED 615 

 

GRIT 699 Image Processing in Multimedia Design 

3 credits 

Students apply principles of instructional and graphic design to develop multimedia graphics and images and then integrate their original graphics into a web-based portfolio presentation. The course provides an introduction to traditional black and white photography, as well as a focus on state of the art graphics technologies such as: Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Flash, and Macromedia Dreamweaver. Students are also required to research issues related to the ethical use and effective implementation of imagery in educational and/or corporate contexts. Prerequisite: GRIT 593 or equivalent 

 

GRIT 700 Technology Integration in Multimedia Development    

3 credits  

This introduction to multimedia initiates course participants into the theory and practice of multimedia development. Students explore and analyze the various software and hardware technologies necessary for the creation, storage and distribution of multimedia elements. They investigate the different authoring tools used in the design of multimedia presentations as well as explore the concepts important in the design of interactive presentations. They analyze the legal and ethical issues pertaining to the use and distribution of media elements. Adobe Premiere is the required software application. Prerequisites: GRIT 541, 699 

 

GRIT 701 Practicum and Portfolio    

1 credit 

This course offers students in the Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification Program the opportunity to complete their required site-based internship in instructional technology. This practicum is planned with a faculty member who supervises the student in the process. Prerequisite: GRIT 685 (ITS specialization only) 

  

GRIT 702 Practicum and Portfolio Presentation   

2 credits 

Students demonstrate through their portfolios their achievement of the Pennsylvania Department of Education standards. In their preparation for the ITS Certification Interview, students demonstrate their technical expertise, organizational skills, and presentation and leadership potential. Prerequisite: GRIT 685 (ITS specialization only) 

 

GRIT 708 Video Production   

3 credits  

This course surveys a quickly changing technology, digitized video. Designed for casual as well as professional use, the Media 100 system has many applications for the professional in communications, education, business and entertainment. The course offers practical experience with state-of-the-art video tools, provides a current perspective of video communications, and prepares its participants for a digital future. Prerequisite: GRIT 541  

GRIT 710 Applied Instructional Design (Summer only)   

3 credits  

Flash, the popular web software for animated graphics provides the software context for this course.  Students research current issues related to the impact of authoring software on the learning process. Relationships between creativity, copyright law, and rapidly changing technology are also examined by students in this course. Projects developed with Flash may become part of the student’s thesis research. Prerequisite: GRIT 700 

  

GRIT 736 Motivation: A Technology Perspective   

3 credits 

This course examines the unique motivational benefits of instructional technology. Through examination of theory regarding natural curiosity and the human desire to learn, students reach a better understanding of how technology motivates. The knowledge that illuminates this important and perhaps neglected issue regarding learning is drawn from literature in attribution theory, emotional intelligence, and the nature of creativity. Also addressed is the need to view teaching and learning holistically, as more than cognition alone. 

  

GRIT 738 Intelligences: From Games to Creative Genius  

3 credits 

This course examines the changing conceptualization of intelligence and how it is related to our culture and expectations within the workplace. The connection between computer games and job performance, the new role of “right-brain” thinking, and the nature of creativity are addressed. Intelligences examined include genius, emotional intelligence, social intelligence and a new perspective on artificial intelligence. Students will be expected to apply understandings of intelligences to projects and collaborative efforts. 

  

GRIT 743 Internship in Leadership and Organizational Change (GIC)                   

3 credits  

This course offers the student both a research and professional development opportunity in that the student works as a research intern in an office, organization or other environment. Students select an organization or institution involved in change that incorporates state-of-the-art technologies. They research the role of leadership in the change process and analyze the impact of changes on structures, roles, and relationships. The data collected in this project form the basis for the student’s seminar research project. 

 

GRIT 748 Transformational Technologies: Research Applications (GIC)              

3 credits  

Students may take a second-level authoring software course as an independent study to continue work on the development of a program begun in the first level course. This second-level course may be required for completion of the research project begun in an earlier course. Prerequisite: GRIT 710 

 

GRIT 750 Transformational Environments: Analysis and Evaluation (GIC)          

3 credits  

Students design the details of their research projects and continue to evaluate their planned data collection strategies. They test their projects on a pilot population and, after analysis of the results, make necessary revisions in their data collection strategies and evaluation methodologies. They use this pilot project as the base for their research for a master’s thesis. Evaluation of the project should include both assessment of the subject’s responses/activities and a qualitative component derived from open-ended questions and interviews, as appropriate. Prerequisite: GRIT 598 

 

GRIT 780 Workshop: Selected Topics      

1 credit 

This course offers the opportunity to gain knowledge and skill in a specific area that, while relevant to the student’s profession, may not be possible, feasible or convenient to obtain as a portion of the student’s required or elective 3 credit courses.  Workshop: Selected Topics is typically offered in an accelerated workshop format.      

  

GRIT 781 Selected Topics (GIC)  

3 credits 

This course offers an opportunity for an advanced student to develop a project in response to a specific problem. Topics are selected from current research on curricular issues, leadership, restructured organizations, distance learning or potential roles of state-of-the-art technologies in emerging environments. Participants review the literature on the selected topic, develop related technical skills, and prepare an original blueprint for the implementation of these technologies in the solution project. Students in the Instructional Design specialization design an interactive virtual environment that they test on a given population. The results of this project form the basis for their seminar research paper. 

 

GRIT 791 Seminar in Instructional Technology  

3 credits  

Students complete and present, in both written and oral presentation formats, the results of the research projects begun in earlier courses. They continue to analyze the literature in their specific areas of interest and consider additional activities in their development as professionals such as leadership roles, publication, and workshop and conference presentations. Prerequisite: GRIT 598 

  

GRIT 795 Thesis Guidance (GIC)     

1 credit 

Students who do not complete a thesis in GRIT 791 Seminar in Instructional Technology may qualify to register for this course. Qualification depends upon the extent to which course requirements for GRIT 791 have been met as well as the circumstances that prevent the student from completing the thesis.  Grade is pass/fail. 

GRIT 798 Ethical Leadership and the Future   

3 credits 

To ensure that Instructional Technology graduates have a comprehensive understanding of the impact of technology on society, this course reviews the literature addressing issues surrounding the use of technology, and encourages students to synthesize their knowledge in the construction of a personal philosophy that will facilitate responsible leadership in technology.  Course activities include the development of a collaborative multimedia project presenting possible scenarios for the future of technology in society.