MASTER OF EDUCATION

 

Chair: Carol M. Pate, Ed.D.
The education department offers the following master’s, certification, and certificate programs:

 

  • ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
    (Including certifications in Elementary Education, Reading Specialist and Special Education)
  • EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
    (Including certification in Early Childhood Education, Early Childhood Education and/or certification in Montessori Education)
  • EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP - ACCELERATED FORMAT
    (Including certification as K-12 School Principal)
  • SECONDARY EDUCATION
    (Including grades (7-12) Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign Languages (K-12): (Spanish, French, and Latin), General Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies. In addition, the education department offers an M.Ed. in Secondary Education with a Literacy Professional designation, and an M.Ed. in Secondary Education with Special Education certification. 

 

CERTIFICATIONS IN:
Elementary Education (K-6)
Early Childhood Education (PreK-3)
Reading Specialist (K-12)
Secondary Education (7-12) Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign Languages: (Spanish, French, and Latin), General Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies.
School Principal (K-12)
Special Education (N-12)
 

 

• MONTESSORI CERTIFICATE  

 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES The Masters in Education (M.Ed.) programs are designed to meet the professional needs of individuals seeking initial or advanced certifications in education and leadership. The primary purpose of Chestnut Hill College’s graduate program in education is to enhance the quality of teaching and prepare candidates for leadership roles, such as school principals and reading specialists. The mission of the education department is to build on the intellectual and holistic foundation of the Mission of Chestnut Hill College by helping students develop the professional skills and attitudes to educate a diverse community of learners. The department seeks to foster a deep commitment to teaching and lifelong learning.
The graduate programs integrate knowledge of theory and practice with field experiences that include student teaching for initial certifications, and comprehensive practicum work for advanced preparation. The specific curriculum programs offer breadth of knowledge and in-depth specialization. Individuals have the opportunity to acquire beginning or advanced knowledge in one or more specialties, to develop greater competence in their disciplines, and to discover innovative and effective approaches to the educational process. The overall objective of these programs is to contribute significantly to the improvement of instruction in the classroom, the leadership in schools, and support services to meet the needs of all children.
PROGRAM COMPETENCIES and EXIT CRITERIA
NOTE: The PA State Board of Education passed Chapter 49.1 and 49.2 regulations that significantly reconfigures the certification requirements for instructional and specialist certification programs. Effective 2013, Early Child hood certification will be Pre-K through Grades 4; Elementary Education has changed to Elementary/Middle School Grades 4-8; and special education has changed to Early Childhood/Elementary - Pre-K through grade 8 and Secondary Grades 7-12. Important: Special Education is not a content area of instruction under the new regulations, therefore all students seeking special education certification must also identify either PreK-4, Middle Level Grades 4-8 or Secondary 7-12 content areas to complete a dual-certification program. In addition, each content area program, including secondary education certification, will be required to include 9 credits/270 hours of special education and 3 credits/90 hours of teaching linguistically different children. This new requirement begins for all certification programs in 2011. Students who begin in the Fall of 2009 and complete their program either in May or December of 2012 will be able to complete the current certification programs (Early Childhood Pre-K -3 and Elementary K-6) and obtain their certification.

Note: Students who do not complete their program by 2012 (either May or December 2012) will be required to have a re-evaluation of their program and determined what additional courses may be necessary to obtain certification. Secondary Education students completing their programs after 2012 will be required to complete the additional coursework as identified above before they are eligible for certification in their respective content areas.
If you have any questions about this, please talk to your advisor or Dr. Pate, Chair of the Education Department.

Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Reading, Secondary Education, and Special Education Certifications
All graduate students in the early childhood, elementary, reading, secondary education and special education certification programs must cognitively, physically and socially attain specific competencies as part of the admissions process, through the completion of approved coursework and fieldwork experiences, and when exiting the program. Evidence of cognitive abilities includes a GPA of 3.0 and successful completion of all courses and field experiences. Evidence of physical capabilities is the ability to fully maintain a safe and supportive learning environment for children as demonstrated through field experiences in specific courses and student teaching. Evidence of social capabilities is the ability to teach with poise, confidence and control in a classroom environment, as well as to develop and maintain professional relationships as demonstrated in coursework and student teaching experiences.
Each certification program identifies specific assessment procedures so that students know what is expected of them, and how the competencies will be assessed. The early childhood, elementary, secondary or special education cooperating teacher evaluates the teacher candidate using both the performance standards and the exit competencies. Candidates also participate in the assessment by completing a comprehensive portfolio that contains competency materials prescribed by the specific program within the department. These materials serve to document the acquisition of competencies.
The reading program evaluates the candidates at the end of practicum II experience. These assessment practices are ongoing and may change as a result of an evaluation of the program.
The competencies for exiting initial certification programs reflect the instructional competencies required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. (PA Ch. 354.33). All competencies required are described below:
A. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline the teacher teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for all students.
B. The teacher understands how all children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, career and personal development.
C. The teacher understands how students differ in their ability and approaches to learning and creates opportunities that foster achievement of diverse learners in the inclusive classroom.
D. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including interdisciplinary learning experiences, to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem-solving and performance skills.
E. The teacher cognitively, physically and socially demonstrates the ability to provide for the safety and well being of all students. The teacher will utilize individual and group behavior strategies that create a learning environment supporting positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-discipline.
F. The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques, supported by appropriate technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
G. The teacher plans instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, students, the community and curriculum goals.
H. The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.
I. The teacher thinks systematically about practice, learns from experience, seeks the advice of others, draws upon educational research and scholarship and actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
J. The teacher contributes to school effectiveness by collaborating with other professionals and parents by using community resources, and by working as an advocate to improve opportunities for student learning.
Exit Criteria
• Completion of all program coursework, field experiences and/or required student teaching in the certification programs.
• GPA of 3.0 or higher
• Successful completion of instructional exit competencies determined by the specific program requirements
• Passing of all appropriate Praxis Series exams required by PDE
 

 

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

 

Teacher candidates seeking the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree in Elementary Education or Early Childhood Education who already hold a bachelor’s degree in education and who also have Pennsylvania Certification must complete a minimum of thirty-six (36) credit hours of graduate work.
Teacher candidates seeking the M.Ed. degree in Elementary Education or Early Childhood Education who already have a bachelor’s degree in education but who do not have Pennsylvania Certification are required to complete student teaching, including an on- campus supervised seminar. These teacher candidates must complete all requirements for certification that are in place at the time of admission.
Teacher candidates seeking the M.Ed. degree who do not have a background in education must take at least one prerequisite course before matriculating into a degree program. These students may also need to complete additional credits (e.g., in English and mathematics) to fulfill Pennsylvania’s requirements for teacher certification. They must also complete student teaching, including an on-campus seminar, and must prepare a portfolio of documentation considered essential for beginning teachers.
Admissions Requirements for Instructional I Certification

In compliance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) regulations, requirements for all students seeking Instructional I certification beginning September 2003, are as follows:
• Documentation of an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher prior to admittance into the program.
• Successful qualifying scores for PPST tests in Reading, Math, Writing before completing six credits of graduate work
• Documentation of two courses in college math and two courses in English, including one in literature and one in writing
• Maintenance of a GPA of 3.0 throughout program
• The completion of admission requirements for the School of Graduate Studies, including letters of recommendation and statement of professional goals. These requirements apply to all initial certification areas.
Note: Admission status for teacher candidates who do not possess an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 will be delayed pending the completion of six credits of “B” level graduate coursework in addition to the successful qualifying scores for the PPST’s in reading, writing and math. All other requirements for admission to the School of Graduate Studies must be met.
Note: Students whose entering GPA is lower than 2.8 will need to qualify under the 10% rule before being accepted into the program. Please meet with the Chair of the Education Department for further information.
Teacher candidates who are employed full-time can usually complete requirements for the master’s degree in two to three years of part-time study.
 

 

ADMISSION AS NON-DEGREE OR NON-CERTIFICATE STUDENT

 

A non-degree/non-certificate student is one who wishes to complete only one or two courses for personal or professional development; or someone who will not be able to complete all steps in the admissions process but who wishes to enroll in a course. Such students may take a maximum of six credits. To earn more than six (6) credits, a student must be accepted and enrolled in a degree or certificate program.
 

 

COURSE WORK OPTIONS

 

Teacher candidates may choose one of two options:
1. Master’s Degree without a Thesis
This requires at least thirty-three semester hours of graduate work, of which no fewer than six (6) credits will be in courses that require significant written reports of a research or professional nature.
2. Master’s Degree with a Thesis
This requires at least twenty-seven semester hours of graduate work taken as courses, plus an approved thesis. When the thesis has been approved and submitted in final form, six credit hours will be added to the student’s academic record.
 

 

PRACTICUM FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS WITH NO CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE

 

Teacher candidates without classroom experience are responsible for arranging experiences in a traditional school setting, either public or private. This may include ten individual observations, or one full week of observation and/or more active involvement, such as tutoring, or assisting. The practicum requirement may include experiences of tutoring, small-group instruc¬tion and/or hands-on practice in a traditional setting. This requirement is intended to help ensure that the candidate has a current background and experience in the classroom setting before beginning student teaching. Documentation of the practicum is required before student teaching, and can include a reflection paper, appropriate to the observation/hands-on experience in traditional settings.
The practicum requirement may be fulfilled in conjunction with Methodology I or II/Field Study (GRELE 600 and 610), or Practicum/Special Methods (secondary certification). Practicum arrangements will be made in consultation with the advisor or the instructor. A packet containing forms for the school and forms to document the experience are available in the Education Office. The advisor will consult the student file for this documentation before signing the permission form for student teaching.
 

 

STUDENT TEACHING

 

The State of Pennsylvania requires that students seeking teacher certification demonstrate a competency in working with children. These teacher candidates must student-teach five full school days per week for fourteen weeks in one semester. Teacher candidates who have not passed the PPST tests will not be admitted to student-teaching.
For teacher candidates who are not currently in a classroom setting, the education department will collaborate to locate and obtain a suitable student-teaching site. In this case, the education department will also obtain permission for the student-teaching experience from the school district.
Student teaching consists of:
1. Supervised teaching experience in selected public, parochial or independent licensed schools or
2. On-the-job supervision of the teacher candidate who currently works as an Intern teacher, (e.g. Philadelphia Teaching Fellow) classroom teacher, (e.g. apprenticeship teacher or parochial school teacher), or a teacher assistant whose situation mirrors the student-teaching requirements. A teacher candidate will be observed up to four times during the 14 weeks of student-teaching experience.

The graduate student who is presently a classroom or assistant teacher in a traditional classroom may use this experience to satisfy the student-teaching requirement. In this case, the student’s own classroom becomes the focus of learning during the semester. The Chestnut Hill College education department, however, must approve the classroom site, and/or situation. Student-teaching placements occur in licensed schools. In these situations, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain permission to assume student teaching responsibilities from the principal or director of the school.
The seminar component of student-teaching enables the faculty supervisor to offer guidance to student teachers, to evaluate the candidate’s progress in the classroom, and to discuss with candidates educational theory and its practical application. Workshops to support specific topics/standards will also be provided on an as-needed basis. These workshops will help ensure that the teaching to the PA Academic Standards is supported in all appropriate content areas. The seminar is required of all candidates registered for student teaching.
If a candidate is not successful in student-teaching, the course cannot be repeated at Chestnut Hill College.
No student may enroll in the student teaching course as his or her first course at Chestnut Hill College. An exception to this policy will be made if the education department of another university initiates the request and receives approval for a student-teaching placement through Chestnut Hill College.
 

 

PORTFOLIO

 

During the student-teaching component of graduate work, teacher candidates are asked to compile a portfolio containing evidence of meeting the exit competencies as identified above. The faculty member supervising the candidate will evaluate the portfolio and submit the evaluation as documentation of the candidate’s completion of this requirement.
 

 

TRANSCRIPT EVALUATION

 

For teacher candidates with undergraduate majors in history/social science, math, science, fine arts, the department Chair may waive the requirement for the appropriate curriculum course. Transcripts will be evaluated to ensure that all PDE requirements for certification, such as two math and English courses, are met. The Chair of the education department will approve courses that meet the math and English prerequisites. An official transcript from the accredited institution must be received before certification can be granted.
Teacher candidates seeking secondary certification must have their undergraduate degree reviewed for course content appropriate to their desired certification area. Liberal Arts departments in designated disciplines have identified specific requirements to meet the PDE equivalency of a major core of study standard. The secondary education coordinator reviews the transcript for to determine the liberal arts and education course content requirements.
Courses that are more than six years old may need to be repeated. This is especially true in areas of psychology and the natural sciences. Exceptions are made for individuals who have recently taken in-service courses through approved educational institutions such as an Intermediate Unit to update their knowledge base or who have recent full-time experience using current pedagogical techniques.
 

 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

 

Candidates may obtain Instructional I certification in Early Childhood, Elementary, Secondary or Special Education in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by completing requirements for the graduate certification program and by obtaining passing scores on the tests in place at the at the time of testing. Testing requirements and passing scores are subject to change, therefore candidates are responsible to comply with regulations that are current at the time of application for certification. A candidate may complete the requirements for the master’s degree without completing student teaching (by substituting appropriate electives), but would not be eligible for Instructional I certification until student teaching is successfully completed.
Candidates who have Instructional I certification may fulfill the requirements for Instructional II certification by taking an additional twenty-four credit hours of course work at the graduate level and documenting three years of successful, full time teaching.
Candidates who have Pennsylvania Certification and who intend to add another area of certification must fulfill all requirements for that area of certification and complete the specific Praxis specialization test for the additional area of certification. (See Option II) Students who are requesting acceptance into a second certification program and have less than a grade of “B” in the previous student teaching experience will need to demonstrate two or more years of successful teaching experience in their area of initial certification. In addition, the contents of the graduate application is reviewed by the Education Department’s Admission and Review committee to determine additional recommendations or reject the application. Students adding a special education certification who have a student teaching grade of less than a “B” in their initial certification will need to either demonstrate two or more years of successful teaching experience in the initial certification area or complete a student teaching experience in special education instead of a practicum.
It is the responsibility of the teacher candidate to apply for certification once they have satisfactorily met the requirements. Once the certifying officer of the education department receives the paperwork, it is the responsibility of the certifying officer to recommend the candidate by sending the signed application to the Pennsylvania Department of Education.
 

 

TEACHER INTERN PROGRAM

 

Chestnut Hill College offers the Teacher Intern Program, providing Intern Certification in biology, chemistry, early childhood education, elementary education, foreign language (Spanish) general science, mathematics, social studies, and special education at the graduate level. These programs are open to qualified applicants who hold a bachelor’s degree in a field other than education and who wish to become teachers. The Teacher Intern Program allows a candidate to gain intern certification before having completed the coursework necessary for Instructional I certification. In order to obtain an Intern Certificate, the candidate must successfully complete tests that are currently required by the state and be accepted into one of the approved Intern programs listed above. Interns comply with all admissions procedures applicable to Instructional I candidates. See http://www.teaching.state.pa.us for further information.
The Intern Program is most appropriate for the individual who already has a teaching job. For example, many bilingual teachers without education degrees are in the Intern Program. The candidate takes five introductory courses and then applies for the certificate in a specific program area. The candidate then has three years to complete the program, including student teaching.
For more information about the Teacher Intern Programs, contact the Chestnut Hill College Education Office by calling 215.248.7126.
Also Offered:
 

 

ACT 48

 

Chestnut Hill College is an Act 48 provider. Forms to apply for Act 48 credit are available in the Education Office.
Phi Delta Kappa Chapter
Chestnut Hill College sponsors a Phi Delta Kappa Chapter for teachers and graduate students interested in continued professional development. Graduate students in any of the certification programs are welcome to become members. Initiation ceremonies are held one or two times each year. Teachers from the surrounding school districts serve as officers of the organization. For more information, please contact the education department.
 

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

 

Chestnut Hill’s graduate program in Elementary Education is designed to be flexible and to meet the needs of graduate students with varying academic backgrounds, certification status and professional goals.
OPTION I M.Ed. in Elementary Education (33 credit hours) is designed for:
• Students who already have Instructional II certification in Elementary Education who wish to acquire a master’s degree; or
• Students who have Instructional I certification in Elementary Education who wish to fulfill the academic requirements for Instructional II certification.
Professional Requirements (12 credits)
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
GRELE 615 Technology in Education
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
GREDE 526 Current Issues in Education
Specialization Requirements I (6 credits, choose two courses)
GRIT 548 PC Technology: Operating Systems and Advanced
Applications
GRIT 560 Web Page Design
GRRDG 525 Technology in English/Language Arts Classroom
GRIT 630 Technology as an Interdisciplinary Tool
GRELE 580 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary Classroom
GRELE 565 Strategies for Teaching Math
GRELE 570 Science in Elementary Years
Specific courses from the Instructional Technology Department, with appropriate approval, may also be taken to satisfy specialization requirements.
Specialization Requirements II (15 credits, choose five courses)
GREDE 650 Classroom Management
GRSPD 525 Assessment and Education of Exceptional Students
GRLDR 570 School Law
GRRDG 615 Reading/Writing in Elementary Schools
GRELE 520 Writing Rubrics
GRRDG 569 Phonics in the Whole Language Program
GREDE 702 Research and Evaluation of Practice II

OPTION II M.Ed. in Elementary Education with certification (36 credits) is designed for those whose undergraduate major is not in education, but who are seeking Instructional I certification in Elementary Education as well as the Master of Education degree.

Prerequisite
GRELE 499 Introduction to Schooling
Each of the following courses is required for Elementary Certification. Additional courses may be required to address specific competencies.
Professional Requirements (15 credits)
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education
GRELE 700 Student Teaching K - 6/Seminar (6 credits)
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
Specialization Requirements (21 credits)
GRELE 615 Technology in Education
GRELE 510 Reading/Children’s Literature
GRELE 520 Writing/Rubrics
GRELE 600 Elementary Methodology I/Field Study
GRELE 610 Elementary Methodology II/Field Study
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
GRELE 565 Strategies for Teaching Math
* Additional course requirements may be necessary to address specific competencies, e.g. GRELE 580, or 570.
 

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND READING SPECIALIST CERTIFICATION, K-12

 

Chestnut Hill College’s graduate program in Elementary Education with Reading Certification is designed to meet the requirements of state reading certification programs (PDE) and is also sufficiently flexible to provide educational opportunities for graduate students with varying professional goals.
This program (33 credits) is designed for:
• Students who already have Instructional II certification and wish to acquire a master’s degree with Reading Certification;
• Students who already have Instructional I certification and wish to satisfy the requirements for Instructional II and Reading Certification;
• Students who wish to gain Reading Certification (21 credits) only. Courses with an (*) fulfill this requirement.
Professional Requirements (12 credits)
GRELE 520 Writing Rubrics
GRRDG 525* Technology in the English Language Arts Classroom
GREDE 526 Current Issues in Education
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
Specialization Requirements I (18 credits)
GRRDG 615* Reading and Writing in the Elementary School
GRRDG 620* Reading and Writing in the Secondary School
GRRDG 551* Building Literacy Competencies
GRRDG 630* Assessment, Diagnosis, Remediation of Reading Difficulties
GRRDG 701* Reading Practicum I
GRRDG 702* Reading Practicum II
Electives (3 credits)
GREDE 650 Classroom Management
GRRDG 569 Phonics in the Whole Language Program
GRSPD 525 Assessment and Education of Exceptional Students
 

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATION, N-12

 

Chestnut Hill College’s graduate program in Elementary Education with Special Education Certification is designed to meet the state requirements for certification in special education for those students with Instructional I certification.
This program (33 credits) is designed for:
• Students who already have Instructional II certification and wish to acquire a master’s degree with certification in special education;
• Students who already have Instructional I certification and wish to satisfy the requirements for Instructional II and certification in special education; and
• Students with either of the above who seek to obtain certification in special education (27 credits). Courses with an * fulfill this requirement. Students with secondary or early childhood certifications may need to take other courses to fulfill the N-12 equivalency. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.
Prerequisite Course Requirements
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education*

Professional Requirements (12 credits)
GRSPD 525* Assessment of Students with Disabilities
GRRDG 569 Phonics in the Whole Language Program
GRSPD 535* Classroom Management for Students with Disabilities
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
n Specialization Requirements (18 credits)
GRSPD 527* Education Practice for Students with Physical/Health and
Communication Disabilities
GRSPD 600* Education Practice for Students with Mild, Moderate or
Severe Cognitive Disabilities
GRSPD 515* Education Practice for Students with Learning and/or
Emotional Disabilities
GRSPD 540* Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities
GRSPD 701* Special Education Practicum I
GRSPD 702* Special Education Practicum II
Electives (3 credits)
GREDE 526 Current Issues in Education
GREDE 702 Research and Evaluation of Practice II

 

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATION

 

This program (36 credits) is designed for:
• Students who do not have Instructional I certification and wish to acquire their first certification in special education;
• Students who already have an Instructional I certification and seek to obtain certification in special education (27 credits). Courses with an * fulfill this requirement. Students with secondary or early childhood certifications may need to take other courses to fulfill the N-12 equivalency. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.
Prerequisite Course Requirements (9 credits)
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education*
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education

Professional Requirements (12 credits)
GRSPD 525* Assessment of Students with Disabilities
GRELE 510 Reading/Children’s Literature
GRSPD 535* Classroom Management for Students with Disabilities

Specialization Requirements (15 credits)
GRSPD 527* Education Practice for Students with Physical/Health and
Communication Disabilities
GRSPD 600* Education Practice for Students with Mild, Moderate or
Severe Cognitive Disabilities
GRSPD 515* Education Practice for Students with Learning and/or
Emotional Disabilities
GRSPD 700 Special Education Student Teaching
OR
GRSPD 703* Special Educ. Student Teaching I
GRSPD 704* Special Educ. Student Teaching II

Note: Students who are completing the special education certification program as their initial teaching certificate MOST LIKELY WILL need to seek additional certification to meet NCLB requirements for highly qualified status. Please discuss the special education program with your advisor.
In addition, some teacher candidates who are teaching in a special education placement under an Intern certificate may; depending on their situation; have their student teaching split into two sections; GRSPD 703 Student Teaching 1 and GRSPD 704 Student Teaching II. In this manner, they will have formative mentoring, support and a mid-term evaluation during their second semester of graduate work and classroom teaching, as well as have a summative evaluation of their teaching during their final semester.
 

 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

 

Chestnut Hill College’s program in Early Childhood Education integrates theory and practice concerning the cognitive, social and educational development of young children grades N-3. The program reflects contemporary research and scholarship in early childhood education and incorporates strategies to meet the needs of special populations, such as students with disabilities and those of diverse cultures. The course of study also takes into consideration the strengths, needs and interests of individual candidates.
OPTION I (33 credit hours) is designed for:
• Students with Instructional II certification in Early Childhood Education who seek the master’s degree;
• Students with Instructional I certification in Early Childhood Education who wish to fulfill the academic requirements for Instructional II certification.
Professional Requirements (9 credits)
GRELE 615 Technology in Education
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
Specialization Requirements I (12 credits)
GREDE 650 Classroom Management
GRSPD 525 Assessment and Education of Exceptional Students
GRECE 525 Designing Environments for Infants and Toddlers
GRECE 565 Administration/Supervision of Early Childhood Programs
Specialization Requirements II (12 credits, choose 4)
GREDE 526 Current Issues in Education
GRLDR 570 School Law
GRRDG 630 Assessment, Evaluation and Remediation of Reading Difficulties
GRELE 520 Writing/Rubrics
Specific courses from the Applied Technology, Special Education or Reading Certification programs, with appropriate approval, may also be taken to satisfy specialization requirements.
OPTION II is designed for those whose undergraduate major is not in education and who seek Instructional I certification in Early Childhood Education as well as the Master of Education degree. This program is 36 credits.
Prerequisite
GRELE 499 Introduction to Schooling
GRELE 550 Developmental Psychology
Professional Requirements (18 credits)
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology
GRECE 505 Theory and Curriculum in Early Childhood Education
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education
GRECE 700 Student Teaching N - 3/Seminar (6 credits)
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
Specialization Requirements (18 credits)
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
GRELE 510 Reading/Children’s Literature
GRELE 520 Writing/Rubrics
GRECE 506 Science, Math, Social Studies K - 3 (prerequisite GRECE 505)
GRELE 615 Technology in Education
GRECE 565 Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood
 

 

Education Programs
EARLY CHILDHOOD WITH MONTESSORI CERTIFICATE

 

There are several options for individuals seeking Montessori certification. The first option provides a M.Ed. in Early Childhood with Montessori certificate. The applicant must have completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and be certified in Early Childhood Education in the state of Pennsylvania. In addition, the applicant must follow the School of Graduate Studies application process described in the admissions section. Students seeking PA state certification in early childhood can earn a M.Ed. in ECE with certification as well as Montessori certificate. Students must meet with the Chair of the Education Department to identify a course of study that will allow for both ECE PA state certification and the Montessori certificate.
Courses for the Montessori certification will be offered in the Fall, spring and new week-long Interim sessions during the summer to increase the opportunities of completing the ASE requirements faster than the traditional semester method. Please consult with the Montessori advisor for more information.
The second option is for students who wish to earn the Montessori certificate only.
Students seeking the Montessori Certificate must pay the American Montessori Society membership fee and MACTE (Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education) fee effective at the time of internship. Students specializing in Montessori Education will be charged an additional per course materials supply fee.
 

 

CONSULTATION / INTERVIEW

 

An initial interview with the Director of Graduate Admissions is suggested upon submission of the formal application. When all supporting documentation (i.e., transcripts, recommendations, professional goals) have been received by the Director of Admissions, an interview with the Director of the Montessori Program and the Chair of the Education department will be scheduled.
Option I: Master’s in Early Childhood with Montessori Certificate
Professional Requirements (12 credits)
GRECE 505 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Curriculum
OR
GREDE 526 Current Issues in Education
GRELE 550 Developmental Psychology
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
Specialization Requirements - Montessori (28 credits)
GRMON 520 Montessori Philosophy and Educational Theory
GRMON 521 Montessori: Everyday Living
GRMON 522 Montessori: Sensorial
GRMON 523 Montessori: Math
GRMON 524 Montessori: Language
GRMON 525 Montessori: Natural and Social Science
GRMON 620/621 Montessori: Internship/Practicum (Fall)
GRMON 622/623 Montessori: Internship/Practicum (Spring)
Students who enter the Montessori program and meet the requirements for the graduate program but want to take the courses at the undergraduate level will need to sign a statement of intent to fulfill the Montessori requirements at the undergraduate level.
Option II: Montessori Certificate – Open to students who have a B.A./B.S. from an accredited institution and seek to obtain graduate credits for the Montessori certificate. A student interested in this certificate program should apply for admission through the School of Graduate Studies for the Montessori Certificate program. Matriculation into this certificate program requires a 3.0 GPA from an undergraduate degree program, official transcripts from undergraduate/graduate programs, three letters of recommendation, professional goals statement and application form. No standardized test is required for the Montessori certificate program. If a student wishes to change to a M.Ed. in ECE with the Montessori certificate, s/he will need to submit a letter requesting to be accepted into the degree program, and submit documentation of passing the PPST’s.
Option III: Non-Graduate Credit Montessori Certificate – Applicants who have a high school diploma or a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution may enroll in the CHC Montessori Teacher Education Program as "non-credit" students. Costs and fees are generally one-half of the credit option. Please refer to the current School of Graduate Studies Semester Course Guide for the fee schedule or contact the Program Director at 215.249.7123 or ColaianniJ@chc.edu. All Montessori Program applicants must interview with the Program Director.
n Specialization Requirements - Montessori (28 credits)
GRMON 520 Montessori Philosophy and Educational Theory
GRMON 521 Montessori: Everyday Living
GRMON 522 Montessori: Sensorial
GRMON 523 Montessori: Math
GRMON 524 Montessori: Language
GRMON 525 Montessori: Natural and Social Science
GRMON 620/621 Montessori: Internship/Practicum (Fall)
GRMON 622/623 Montessori: Internship/Practicum (Spring)

Please note. Students completing the Option III – Non-Graduate Credit Montessori Certificate will only receive the American Montessori Society credential and will not in the future receive any undergraduate or graduate college credit for the coursework. Students choosing Option III – No-credit Montessori Certificate, have up to six weeks to request a change of status to either a M.Ed. in ECE with Montessori Certificate or Montessori Certificate Program (Option II) earning either graduate or undergraduate credits. An agreement must be signed at that time and the difference in tuition will be due immediately.
Option III students must follow the same attendance policy and completion of required assignments. At the completion of each course, students will receive either a Pass or Fail grade.
 

 

SECONDARY EDUCATION

 

Chestnut Hill College offers an M.Ed. in secondary education, including certification in the areas of Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign Languages (K-12): (Spanish, French, and Latin), General Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies. In addition, the education department offers an M.Ed. in Secondary Education with a Literacy Professional designation, and an M.Ed. in Secondary Education with Special Education certification.
The secondary education pedagogical courses listed below are numbered both in the undergraduate and graduate programs. Please be advised that graduate credits are designed for post-baccalaureate students who are seeking certification in secondary education (Grades 7-12 or K-12 (foreign language certifications)) with undergraduate degrees other than education (biology, chemistry, citizenship, English, foreign language (Spanish, French or Latin), general science, math and social studies). Additional requirements may be necessary for students taking these courses for graduate credit.
For Certification Level I, see steps listed under Requirements for Instructional I Certification. All students seeking secondary certification are required to meet the exit competencies identified earlier.
Graduate students who are seeking the M.Ed. in Secondary Education in addition to secondary certification will take the following graduate courses:
Professional Requirements: 15 credits required
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
GRSEC 700 Student Teaching in Secondary School and Seminar (6 credits)

Specialization Requirements: 10 credits required
GRSEC 525 General Methods in Secondary Education
GRSEC 530 Reading in the Content Area (1 credit)
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
(Practicum limited to 3 credits, one course)
GRSEC 549 Practicum: Special Methods in Biology
GRSEC 552 Practicum: Special Methods in Foreign Language
GRSEC 554 Practicum: Special Methods in Mathematics
GRSEC 556 Practicum: Special Methods in English
GRSEC 558 Practicum: Special Methods in Social Studies
GRSEC 662 Practicum: Special Methods in Chemistry/General Science

Electives for M.Ed. In Secondary Education: 9 credits required
GRLDR 500 Conceptual Foundations for School Leadership
GRLDR 510/511 Curriculum Theory, Development and Issues
GRELE 615 Technology in Education (May be used for technology specialization)
GREDE 650 Classroom Management
GRSPD 525 Assessment of Students with Disabilities
GRSPD 515 Educational Practice for Students with Learning
and/or Emotional Disabilities
GRRDG 551 Building Literacy Competencies
GRLDR 570 Educational Law and Legal Processes
GRELE 520 Writing / Rubrics
GREDE 705 Thesis (6 Credits)
 

 

M.Ed. in Secondary Education with Literacy Professional designation: This program is for candidates who wish to formalize knowledge, skills and dispositions in the area of literacy as part of their certification and master’s degree program in secondary education. This would be most appropriate for candidates who have an undergraduate degree in English or the Social Studies arena (History, Social Studies). The majority of the literacy courses are part of Chestnut Hill College’s reading specialist certification program. Candidates who complete this degree option are eligible to finish their reading specialist certification coursework and certification by completing the practicum courses and any additional course(s) recommended by the advisors. The courses for this degree and literacy professional designation include:

Professional Requirements: 15 credits required
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
GRSEC 700 Student Teaching in Secondary School and Seminar (6 credits)
Specialization Requirements: 12 credits required
GRSEC 525 General Methods in Secondary Education
GRRDG 620 Reading and Writing in the Secondary School
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
(Practicum limited to 3 credits, one course)
GRSEC 549 Practicum: Special Methods in Biology
GRSEC 552 Practicum: Special Methods in Foreign Language
GRSEC 554 Practicum: Special Methods in Mathematics
GRSEC 556 Practicum: Special Methods in English
GRSEC 558 Practicum: Special Methods in Social Studies
GRSEC 662 Practicum: Special Methods in Chemistry/General Science
M.Ed. In Secondary Education: Literacy Professional designation (12 credits)
GRRDG 615 Reading and Writing in the Elementary School
GRRDG 625 Technology in the Language Arts Classroom
GRRDG 630 Diagnosis, Assessment, Evaluation and
Remediation of Students With Difficulties in
Literacy Acquisition
GRRDG 551 Building Literacy Competencies
*Post Master’s: PA State Reading Specialist Certification courses
GRRDG 701 Reading Practicum I
GRRDG 702 Reading Practicum II
GRELE 520 Writing / Rubrics* Non-English certification only

Note: Instructional I required for Reading Specialist Certification

M.Ed. in Secondary Education with special education certification: This program is for candidates who wish to formalize knowledge, skills and dispositions in the area of special education as part of their certification and master’s degree program in secondary education. This would be most appropriate for candidates who are teaching on an Intern certificate in special education in a middle or high school classroom and are required to pass the PA Praxis II test in a specific secondary education content area (English, Biology, Chemistry, General Science, Foreign Language (Spanish, French, or Latin), Mathematics or Social Studies. The candidates would complete the special education certification coursework and student teaching in a special education classroom, with the added benefit of completing secondary education pedagogy to support their teaching in middle or high school settings. Candidates would first apply for an Instructional I certificate in special education then add the secondary education certification once having been approved for the special education certification. Candidates who teach in life skills classrooms at the middle or high school level are advised to complete an elementary and special education degree program. The courses for this degree and certification include:

Professional Requirements: 15 credits required
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I
GRSPD700 Student Teaching in Special Education and Seminar (6 credits), or
GRSPD 703 and 704 Special Education Student Teaching I and II (for candidates currently teaching on an Intern certificate.)

Specialization Requirements: 13 credits required
GRSEC 525 General Methods in Secondary Education
GRELE 510 Reading /Child. Lit
GRSEC 530 Reading in Content Area (1 credit)
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education
(waived if Intern Certificate is held)
(Practicum limited to 3 credits, one course)
GRSEC 549 Practicum: Special Methods in Biology
GRSEC 552 Practicum: Special Methods in Foreign Language
GRSEC 554 Practicum: Special Methods in Mathematics
GRSEC 556 Practicum: Special Methods in English
GRSEC 558 Practicum: Special Methods in Social Studies
GRSEC 662 Practicum: Special Methods in Chemistry/General Science

Requirements for special education certification (15 credits)
GRSPD 525* Assessment of Students with Disabilities
GRSPD 535* Classroom Management of Students with Disabilities
GRSPD 527* Education Practice for Students with Physical/Health
& Communication Disabilities
GRSPD 600* Education Practice for Students with Mild,
Moderate and/or Severe Cognitive Disabilities
GRSPD 515* Education Practice for Students with Learning and/or
Emotional Disabilities
Electives for M. Ed. (For candidates with prior coursework)
GRSPD 540 Assistive Technology
GRLDR 540 School Law
 

 

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP – ACCELERATED AND INTENSIVE SUMMER FORMAT

 

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM
The Graduate Program in Educational Leadership is designed to provide educators with the skills and concepts necessary to function as principals in K-12 settings. Establishing a positive school climate, developing school goals, supervision and evaluation of teaching and non-teaching staff members and building community support for schools are some of the skills developed in this program. Curriculum development and assessment will be a major focus for all candidates. This program will be offered in an accelerated format in fall and spring semesters (two eight-week sessions each semester) and in the regular six-week intensive format in the summer sessions. The courses will be experiential in nature with an emphasis on field studies. The role of technology in educational leadership will be stressed.
ACCELERATED AND INTENSIVE SUMMER PROGRAM FORMAT
This program is designed or the working education professional who wishes to complete the program as quickly as possible. In the accelerated format, classes meet on Saturdays or in the early evening one-to-two times a week in the accelerated time span. Distance education through the use of the Internet is an integral part of the program, which may reduce on-campus time. A final four-credit practicum is required. By taking one course each eight-week fall and spring sessions, and the INTENSIVE (regularly scheduled six-week summer sessions for Summer I and III), you will be able to gain certification in as little as 15 months, and a M.Ed. in 24 months. Students who begin in the program need to stay enrolled so that they are able to complete the required program on schedule. If students decide to skip a semester, the courses they need may not be offered until the following term. Please consult with your advisor for any changes in your program.
Because of its accelerated and intensive summer format, the schedule for the master’s degree in Educational Leadership is four semesters long:
Fall 1 and 2 = Fall Semester
Spring 1 and 2 = Spring Semester
Summer I and III = Summer I and III Semesters
Classes usually meet once each week or on Saturdays during each eight-week session.
Please consult the current academic calendar for specific dates and times of these courses.
 

 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES / STATE STANDARDS

 

• Compares the various philosophical and theoretical bases that underlie educational thought / Standard I.A
• Recognizes and analyzes the implication of the major curricular ideologies / Standard I.A
• Understands the basic tenets of school, labor relations and their implications for the successful principal / Standard I.C, I.D
• Knows the process of federal programs and their implementation / Standard I.C, I.D
• Devises traditional and non-traditional school schedules / Standard I.B, II
• Understands the role of the principal in creating a school environment that is perceived by the community, staff and students as one that is safe and orderly, one which fosters positive intellectual, social, physical, and psychological student growth / Standard I.B, I.A, I.F.
• Recognizes the interrelationships among individuals and groups of different races, sexes, religious beliefs, national origins, and socio-economic backgrounds, and assumes a leadership role in inter-group relations / Standard I.C, I.F
• Knows the role of the principal in developing a curriculum that reflects the goals and objectives of the school / Standard I.B
• Can devise a system of program evaluation and monitoring that provides for ongoing curriculum assessment, development and implementation / Standard I.F, I.B
• Is able to plan a budget that is based upon programmatic and facility needs / Standard I.E
• Practices communication skills necessary to facilitate interaction between individuals / Standard III.C
• Can interpret and implement a collaborative decision-making model / Standard III.D
• Is able to plan, implement and evaluate the use of technology in both administration and instruction / Standard I.B, I.F
• Is able to analyze, interpret and use research on teacher effectiveness and supervision / Standard I.A, III.A
• Demonstrates how research in Human Growth and Development and Learning Theories can be effectively utilized / Standard I.B
• Defines the role of the principal in managing the physical plant / Standard I.E
• Is able to successfully implement the above competencies in an internship project that demonstrates student control and direction / Standard II
 

 

EXIT COMPETENCIES

 

In compliance with Chapter 354.33 (iv), the following are the exit competencies for all principal certification and educational leadership degree candidates:
1. Demonstrates instructional leadership;
2. Demonstrates organizational skills;
3. Utilizes collaborative decision-making techniques;
4. Demonstrates effective communication skills;
5. Understands the relationship between an educational philosophy and curriculum development;
6. Utilizes needs assessment strategies;
7. Demonstrates an ability to continue to grow professionally.
Note: The above competencies will be assessed through portfolio completion, internship and course requirements.
 

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

Students seeking a master’s degree in educational leadership must complete a minimum of thirty-four credits. The program is intended for those who are currently in the education profession. Students must fulfill the requirements listed below:
1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution;
2. An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in their major or graduate GPA of 3.0;
3. Official transcript(s) of all previous college and university study, both graduate and undergraduate;
4. Three years of successful full-time contractual teaching experience in an elementary school or a secondary school;
5. Resume or Vita, and a statement of the applicant’s professional goals in essay form;
6. Three letters of recommendation from colleagues, principals, etc.;
7. Written assessment from the applicant’s principal which evaluates the candidate in the areas of decisiveness, educational values, judgment, leadership, oral and written communication, organizational ability, personal motivation, problem analysis, range of interests, interpersonal relations, and stress tolerance;
8. Written statement from the applicant’s current principal indicating his/her agreement to permit student to participate in a leadership practicum.
9. Improvement and/or problem-solving project which is to be mutually agreed upon by both the school principal and the College advisor;
10. Formal exit interview.

 

 

INTERNSHIP

 

A vital part of the educational leadership program is the internship. The candidate seeking specialization in leadership must complete a full semester in a supervised internship in a school setting. The candidate will define a program improvement and/or problem-solving project that will be carried out in the student’s home school. The candidate’s Chestnut Hill College instructor must approve the project. The candidate’s Principal/Supervisor must agree to allow the internship and project to take place in their school. The candidate’s Principal/Supervisor will be an integral part of the internship.
The internship may not take place until at least 24 credits are completed.
 

 

CURRICULUM

 

Core courses:
GRLDR 500 Conceptual Foundations for School Leadership One semester 3 credits
GRLDR 510/511 Curriculum Theory, Development and Issues Two semester 6 credits
GRLDR 520 The Principal as an Effective Agent of Change One semester 3 credits
Professional Requirements:
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation One semester 3 credits
GRLDR 687 Technology and the Administrator One semester 3 credits
GRLDR 630 Personnel and Pupil Administration and Management
One semester 3 credits
GRLDR 680 The Improvement of Instruction, Staff Development
and Supervision One semester 3 credits
GRLDR 590 School/Community Relations One semester 3credits
GRLDR 570 School Law One semester 3 credits
GRLDR 701 Internship One semester 4 credits
 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Early Childhood Course Descriptions
GRECE 505 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood  

 

3 credits
A variety of theories about how young children learn and develop is presented in this course. Theory and practice are interwoven as various materials and learning styles are examined and related to the child’s growth and development. Curriculum models are discussed in detail. Historical influences and important educational philosophies are presented. Current trends in curriculum development and their implementation are also examined.
GRECE 506 Science, Math and Social Studies: N-3  

 

3 credits
This course deals with the knowledge, skills and content needed in the N-3 classroom to teach science, mathematics and social studies. Techniques and methods to develop each area, as well as suggestions for integration, will be explored. The importance of planning the appropriate type and sequence of activities for the child’s developmental level and demonstrated skill is stressed. Prerequisite: GRECE 505
GRECE 525 Designing Environments for Infants and Toddlers  

 

3 credits
The environmental design and program content appropriate for children under the age of three are explored in this course. Both environment and program will be examined in a developmental as well as practical context in order to extend the student’s understanding of the needs of very young children. Special emphasis is placed on health and safety issues in infant/toddler programs. This course also focuses on the administration of quality programs that services the needs of both the very young child and the family.
GRECE 565 Admin. and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs  

 

3 credits
The administration of programs in Early Childhood Education is the focus of this course, which deals with methods of parent orientation and participation, staff recruitment, relevant legal issues for administrators of early childhood programs, techniques of supervision, observation of staff and evaluation of children's programs. Students will examine, analyze and develop general operating and personnel procedures.
Elementary Education Course Descriptions
GRELE 499 Introduction to Schooling  

 

1 credit
This course is designed for students with limited background in education. In it, students review current literature in the area of schooling and examine the forces that have produced the current educational climate. Classroom observations are included as part of the course content. This course cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements. Work experience with children, or volunteer experience in a school can exempt the non-education major from this course.
GRELE 506 Foundations of Education  

 

3 credits
This course places the role of the teacher and of the school in historical perspective and relates both roles to society. Students explore the connections among culture, politics, economics and education. The differences between education and schooling are examined, and current educational reform movements are explored within the context of critical educational theory.
GRELE 510 Reading / Children’s Literature  

 

3 credits
Students explore the development of oral language in the child and its impact on reading and writing as related processes. Examination of methods and materials in reading, writing, and integrated language programs is featured. Also provided is an in-depth knowledge of each genre of children’s literature within the areas of fantasy and realism. Methods for integrating children’s literature throughout the curriculum will be presented.
GRELE 520 Writing / Rubrics  

 

3 credits
Students learn theories and practices of teaching process writing in the elementary school. Process writing is utilized for the purpose of organizing and understanding new information from text, discussion, visuals and lecture. This course offers knowledge and skills to enable teachers to deal with specific reading problems and the special needs of students. Required for reading specialists.
GRELE 530 Introduction to Special Education  

 

3 credits
This course is designed to provide a complete overview of Special Education and the children who receive special education services. Areas of concentration include: classifications and definitions, patterns of learning, description of assessment and intervention strategies, legislation, and inclusion. To obtain a broader, more comprehensive perspective, students will conduct research through journal articles, Internet searches, classroom observations and interviews of parents and/or teachers.
GRELE 535 Educational Psychology  

 

3 credits
This course stresses the application of psychological principles of growth and development, thinking, learning and motivation to education in the home, school and community.
GRELE 550 Developmental Psychology  

 

3 credits The focus of this course is on normal development, with emphasis on the pre-school and school-aged child. Theory and research in the areas of sensorimotor, language, cognitive, emotional, social and moral behaviors are included. The interaction of biological and environmental factors influencing growth and development is stressed.
GRELE 565 Strategies for Teaching Mathematics  

 

3 credits
In this course, students explore the structure of mathematics, sets and numbers, systems of numeration, problem-solving and skill development. The content of elementary school mathematics and the development of strategies for effective teaching of mathematical concepts in K-6 classrooms are emphasized. Students will examine the NCTM Curriculum and Evaluation Standards (1989) and Professional Teaching Standards (1991) to evaluate curriculum requirements, manipulatives, activities and computer software designed for the elementary school classroom.
GRELE 570 Science for the Elementary Years  

 

3 credits
Methods and approaches for teaching science in the elementary grades are presented. Science is examined as both process and body of knowledge. Current programs are investigated and evaluated as to balance of approach. "Hands on" experiences in use of laboratory equipment are provided, as well as opportunities to improvise suitable substitutions for standard equipment.
GRELE 580 Social Studies Education  

 

3 credits
Current social forces and issues affecting the elementary school child are the focus of this course. The methodology of social studies instruction and the analysis and evaluation of social studies programs are examined. Students develop teaching and resource units and devise ways to educate children in the process of problem solving.
GRELE 600 Elementary Methodology I / Field Study  

 

3 credits
This course examines all aspects of planning for instruction including materials, curricular organization, and textbook utilization. A thematic approach to unit planning will be presented, integrating all subjects, including Art and Music. Classroom management strategies will be discussed including motivation, grouping, physical layout, climate and discipline. This course examines the opportunities to extend learning through homework, utilizing community resources, parental involvement and the library. Effective student assessment through the use of standardized test interpretation, formative and summative evaluations, portfolios and anecdotal records is presented. In addition, supporting a multicultural classroom, understanding gender differences and celebrating diversity will be included. Effective utilization of school support staff will be explored. The multiple intelligence theory will be correlated to lesson planning and activities. Students will also examine implications of PA Academic Standards.
GRELE 610 Elementary Methodology II / Field Study  

 

3 credits
This course has two strands. The first will emphasize social studies and citizenship education. The second will emphasize science education in the elementary classroom. Students will incorporate a thematic approach when planning a unit or lesson as well as integrating Art and Music teaching strategies throughout. It is expected that students will utilize the objectives presented in Methodology I in all activities and assessments in this course. Students will examine implications of PA Academic Standards. Prerequisite: GRELE 600
GRELE 615 Technology in Education  

 

3 credits
In this course students will learn to use word processing, database and spreadsheet software in an integrated package. Students will also learn to integrate knowledge organizers, web resources and educational software into thematic units, addressing the National Educational Technology Standards.

 

 

Education Course Descriptions

 

(for courses that fulfill Master’s degree requirements in more than one program)
GREDE 526 Current Issues in Education  

 

3 credits
In this course, special topics are explored, such as kindergarten curriculum, the assessment of children for school placement, multicultural and diversity issues, including gender, socio-economic status, race and exceptionality.
GREDE 650 Classroom Management  

 

3 credits
This course examines the steps teachers must take in order to create an effective learning environment in their classrooms. Topics to be discussed will include: the physical layout of the room; grouping for instruction; time management; providing authentic learning tasks; instructional methods as they apply to management, and the interrelationship of management and effective discipline. Curricular organization will be explored in terms of effective management.
GREDE 701 Research and Evaluation of Practice I  

 

3 credits
This course focuses on research and evaluation methodologies concerning the practice of teaching. Foremost will be an examination of basic elements inherent in the design and execution of research and evaluation, and the attendant epistemological and ethical issues in its classroom implementation. Students will learn to critique published research and evaluation projects. Students will also develop a problem statement and literature review in order to become familiar with the contributions of educational researchers, teachers, and/or other professionals to the practice of teaching.
GREDE 702 Research and Evaluation of Practice II  

 

3 credits
This course provides an opportunity for students to find and develop their voices with respect to teaching and its practice in the classroom or other educational organization. The meaning of reflective practice and various forms of teacher research including the use of journals, oral inquiry, action research and conceptual analysis will be presented and analyzed. As beginning teacher researchers, students will design, implement and critique a research or evaluation project carried out in their selected teaching practice situation.
GREDE 704 Independent Study  

 

3 credits
The Independent study format gives students an opportunity to develop critical thinking and individual initiative through planned scholarly endeavor. Under the guidance of a faculty sponsor the student will investigate an area of interest related to the student's course of study and to his/her teaching situation. Students will work under the guidance of a faculty member and with the permission of the Department Chair. The interested student must produce a project, paper, or piece of research demonstrating ability to pursue an independent academic endeavor as well as competence in researching, organizing and presenting information. May be elected only after completing five required courses.
GREDE 705 Thesis  

 

3 credits
A thesis may be substituted for two elective courses. To be eligible, students must demonstrate competence in research methods, in-depth knowledge of an area of specialization within the field of education, and ability to present materials with clarity, accuracy, and style. The thesis is completed under the direction of a faculty advisor, is evaluated by a thesis committee of the education department and must be defended by the student.
Reading Specialist Course Descriptions
GRRDG 525 Technology in the English Language Arts  

 

3 credits
This course highlights the learning theories, content, and computer applications specific to technology in the English Language Arts classroom. Students research the use of the word processor for writing, as well as evaluate writing assistant packages and desktop publishing. They also analyze and evaluate the use of instructional software in the teaching of reading and language skills in keeping with a whole language approach to instruction and evaluation, and the Standards of the National Council of Teachers of English/International Reading Association.
GRRDG 551 Building Literacy Competencies  

 

3 credits
This course investigates forms of literacy competency in our post-typographic culture. In it candidates will explore ways to understand media and their connections to literacy. The intent is to provide a theoretical basis for reading specialists, from which strategies for improving children’s abilities to create and comprehend meaning can be developed. In addition, this course identifies linguistic differences across cultures, geographical locations, and socio-economic levels. Prerequisite: GRRDG 615, GRIT 625
GRRDG 569 Phonics in the Whole Language Classroom  

 

3 credits
Research evidence for direct teaching of phonics in the early grades is supported by recent studies of successful readers and writers in both urban and suburban settings. This course provides the Kindergarten/Primary teacher with the strategies and practice for teaching the coding skills in the whole language classroom. Approaches include teaching to phonemic awareness, journaling, invented spellings, language experience approach, and group reading within a holistic experience.
GRRDG 615 Strategies for Teaching Reading and Writing in the Elementary School  

 

3 credits
This is an advanced reading/writing course for students with a basic knowledge of literacy acquisition. Intended for reading specialist candidates, this course addresses the design of a classroom literacy program for a multicultural population that promotes and supports literature-based models and multi-sensory approaches. Students will use theoretical rationales supporting literacy growth through choice, risk-taking, immersion and engagement. Required for reading specialists.
GRRDG 620 Reading and Writing in the Secondary Classroom  

 

3 credits
This comprehensive course is designed to help teachers develop proficiency in instructional strategies for content areas in the secondary classroom. Theoretical foundations supporting holistic frameworks will be stressed. Strategies for improving study skills, reading varied genres and writing to learn are included. Prerequisite: GRRDG 615. Required for reading specialists.
GRRDG 630 Assessment, Evaluation and Remediation of Reading Difficulties  

 

3 credits
In this course, teachers extend their knowledge and skills to deal with specific reading problems and with the special needs of students. Causation, remediation and prevention through appropriate instruction are considered. Required for reading specialists
GRRDG 701 Reading Practicum I  

 

3 credits
This is an advanced course in assessment and recovery that focuses on the needs of students with significant problems in literacy acquisition that require more intensive remedial procedures. The design and implementation of innovative assessment and recovery techniques corresponding to current research and theory will be stressed. Conferencing and collegial inquiry will be practiced. A practicum placement is required in which the reading student works with an individual student or a small group in a tutorial situation. Students will demonstrate their competence by developing a professional portfolio of reading, writing and assessment activities, and will be evaluated in terms of the exit competencies of the reading program. Prerequisites: GRIT 625, GRRDG 615, 620, and 630. Permission of the Reading Coordinator is required.
GRRDG 702 Reading Practicum II  

 

3 credits
In this practicum students will develop a classroom reading program which correlates with the theoretical foundation and instructional and assessment processes developed through the certification program. Students will demonstrate their competence by developing a professional portfolio of reading and writing activities that supports ranges of achievement. This practicum will be supervised. Students will be evaluated by the exit competencies of the reading program. Prerequisite: GRRDG 701. Permission of the Reading Coordinator is required.
Secondary Education Course Descriptions
GRSEC 525 General Methods - for Secondary Education  

 

3 credits
The preparation of students in all major departments for general knowledge applicable to secondary school curricula is the focus of this course, which addresses issues of lesson plan and unit preparation, grading, tracking, inclusion and physical and mental health of adolescents.
GRSEC 530 Reading in the Content Area - for Secondary Education  

 

1 credit
The focus of this course is on meta-cognitive processes in reading for all disciplines in the junior and senior high school curricula. Strategies for improving vocabulary comprehension, reasoning and problem solving, and study techniques are addressed.
GRSEC 549 Practicum/Special Methods in Biology/General Sciences - for Secondary Education  

 

3 credits
This course is designed to integrate general principles of education and the teaching process into the teaching of biology on a secondary level, with a special focus on preparing and conducting laboratory experiments. This course will be offered as needed and is required of all candidates for secondary certification in biology.
GRSEC 552 Practicum/Special Methods in Foreign Language - for Secondary Education  

 

3 credits
This course prepares teachers of foreign languages, levels K-12. It includes the discussion of current methodology in foreign language teaching, linguistic principles and practical experience. Students become familiar with the ACTFL guidelines and the National Standards for Modern Languages and learn how to incorporate them into their teaching. Students develop sample lessons, participate in observation, and obtain familiarity with current research in foreign language pedagogy. This course is required of all candidates for secondary certification in a foreign language, and will be offered as needed.
GRSEC 554 Practicum/Special Methods in Mathematics For Secondary Education  

 

3 credits
This course covers topics considered essential for successful teaching of mathematics at the secondary level, including careful analysis of the standards and goals established by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Students observe classes and meet for discussion on content, methods, lesson planning, test construction, and other items related to secondary teaching. This course is required of all candidates for secondary certification in Mathematics and will be offered as needed.
GRSEC 556 Practicum/Special Methods in Areas of English - for Secondary Education  

 

3 credits
This course consists of observation and participation in secondary classrooms in both public and private settings. Students participate in a middle school, junior high school, or senior high school setting for at least one half-day per week. Field experience is combined with on-campus course work focused on classroom and instructional management. (48-hours minimum)
GRSEC 562 Special Methods in Chemistry - for Secondary Education  

 

3 credits
This course integrates general principles of education into the teaching of chemistry on a secondary level, with special focus on preparing and conducting laboratory experiments. This course is required of all candidates for secondary certification in chemistry or general science and will be offered as needed.
GRSEC 700 Student Teaching in Secondary School and Seminar  

 

6 credits
This course encompasses a semester of student teaching in a selected public or private middle school, junior high school or senior high school. Student teaching is under the direct supervision of the cooperating teacher and college supervisor. Student teachers participate in a weekly student teaching seminar at the College to correlate general skills and principles of teaching and learning with field experience. Seminar discussions include reflection, identification and analysis of problems facing student teachers. Prerequisite: Completion of coursework in education and approval of major department and education department.
Special Education Course Descriptions
GRSPD 515 Education Practice for Students with Learning and/or Emotional Disabilities  

 

3 credits
This course examines current research and practice on the needs of students with learning disabilities, attention deficit disorders and emotional and/or behavioral disorders. Methods for including these students in the regular classroom are provided, with lesson plans identifying modifications to the existing curriculum, including the development of IFSPs, IEPs, and ITPs. A beginning survey of behavior management techniques, including functional behavioral assessments, will be addressed. Prerequisite: GRELE 530 (Can be taken concurrently with GRSPD 525 only with special permission)
GRSPD 525 Assessment of Students with Disabilities  

 

3 credits
Current practices in assessment of students with disabilities, including the use of multicultural assessments, are the focus of this course. Students will review the issues of informal as well as standardized testing requirements under state and federal regulations and policies. In addition, authentic assessment practices, such as portfolios, will be examined for different areas of special need. Prerequisite: GRED 720
GRSPD 527 Education Practice for Students with Physical/Health & Communication Disabilities  

 

3 credits
Current research and practice regarding the needs of students with physical/health and communication disabilities, including visual and hearing deficits, are examined in this course. Methods for including these students in the regular classroom and examination of the range of differences and similarities of this student group provide content for the course, including the development of IFSPs, IEPs, and ITPs. Students develop lesson plans that either specify adaptations to existing curriculum or special curriculum needs, such as life skills. This course includes sensory aspects of disability across the lifespan. Prerequisite: GRELE 530 (Can take concurrently with GRSPD 525 only with special permission)
GRSPD 535 Classroom Management for Students With Disabilities  

 

3 credits
The content and practice knowledge needed to create an effective learning environment for students with disabilities in inclusive and/or separate learning environments are examined in this course. Students learn how to select, evaluate, and interpret specific behavioral assessments (including informal, functional, ecological and behavioral assessments) and utilize appropriate management strategies in the classroom. The development of behavioral intervention plans enablestudents to plan specific strategies to help increase attention span and support the completion of classroom assignments. Prerequisites: GRELE 530 and GRSPE 525.
GRSPD 540 Assistive Technology For Students With Disabilities  

 

3 credits
This course introduces and provides experience with various computer-based and other assistive technologies for students with disabilities. The technologies include everything from electric wheelchairs, standing tables, adaptive battery and non-battery operated toys, to more sophisticated augmentative communication (such as voice synthesizers, communication boards, computerized communication devices), and infra-red devices for computer and software access and use. In addition, the students examine federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized equipment and materials, the design of IEP and ITP goals related to instructional and/or assistive technology, local, state and/or community assistive technology resources, and the selection and use of various technologies for students with disabilities in inclusive and separate educational settings
GRSPD 600 Education Practice for Students with Mild, Moderate or Severe Cognitive Disabilities 

 

3 credits
This course examines current research and practice regarding the needs of students with mental disabilities, including children with brain injury. Methods for including these students in the regular classroom and examination of the range of the differences and similarities of this student group provide content of the course, including the development of IFSPs, IEPs, and ITPs. Students develop lesson plans that either specify adaptations to existing curriculum or special curriculum needs, such as life skills. Prerequisite: GRELE 530 (Can take concurrently with GRSPD 525 only with special permission)
GRSPD 700 Student Teaching/Seminar, Special Education K-12  

 

6 credits
The student teaching experience for special education is for students who are seeking instructional I certification in special education. This course replaces the two practicum requirements for teachers who already have an Instructional I certification in elementary, early childhood or secondary education. This course requires 14 weeks of classroom combining observation and teaching. At the end of the experience, students are evaluated through the PDE 430 form. In addition, all students are required to complete a portfolio.
GRSPD 701 Special Education Practicum I  

 

3 credits
Special education practicum experiences take place in a public or private school-based environment in which practicum students will be assigned a mentor teacher who already holds certification in special education. The practicum students’ primary responsibility is to design, implement and evaluate effective instruction for students with mild to moderate disabilities in the least restrictive environment, in an elementary, middle school or secondary school. In order to accomplish this, the students will also be required to have experiences that allow for effective communication and collaboration with educational partners, such as parents, organizations and advocacy groups. Students are expected to spend from 100-150 hours depending on past background and experience. Placements are arranged in collaboration with the student and selected sites. Permission of the instructor is required. Practicum includes a seminar experience.
Summer programs that offer academic as well as other supports are appropriate as practicum sites as long as the student has previous experience in a classroom environment.
GRSPD 702 Special Education Practicum II  

 

3 credits
Special education practicum experiences are held in a public or private school-based environment in which practicum students will be assigned a mentor teacher who already holds certification in special education. The practicum students’ primary responsibility is to design, implement and evaluate effective instruction for students with moderate to severe disabilities in the least restrictive environment, depending on the severity of the disability. In order to accomplish this, the students will also be required to have experiences that allow for effective communication and collaboration with educational partners, such as parents, organizations and advocacy groups. Students are expected to spend from 100-150 hours in a placement depending on past background and experience. Placements will be arranged in collaboration with the student and selected sites. Permission of the instructor is required. Practicum includes a seminar experience.
Summer programs that offer academic as well as other supports are appropriate as practicum sites as long as the student has previous experience in a classroom environment.
GRSPD 703 Student Teaching/Seminar I, Special Education K-12  

 

3 credits
The student teaching experience I for special education is for students who are teaching in a special education classroom under an Intern certificate and were admitted under the approved Intern program. The student will be observed 2-3 times during their second semester of teaching and graduate work. In addition, the student will attend seminar meetings to begin the development of their final portfolio, discuss teaching issues and participate in role playing and other pedagogical assignments designed to strengthen their teaching strategies. Classroom management issues, strategies and supports will be paramount during this time. At the end of the semester, students will observed and completed a mid-teaching evaluation through the PDE 430 form. It will serve as a guide to teachers in preparation for their final PDE 430 evaluation during their final semester.
GRSPD 704 Student Teaching/Seminar II, Special Education K-12  

 

3 credits
The student teaching experience II for special education is for students who are teaching in a special education classroom under an Intern certificate and were admitted under the approved Intern program. The student will be observed 2-3 times during their final semester of teaching and graduate work for the special education certification program. In addition, the student will attend seminar meetings to finalize their final portfolio, discuss teaching issues and participate in role playing and other pedagogical assignments designed to strengthen their teaching strategies. Legal, instructional issues, strategies and supports will be paramount during this time. At the end of the semester, students will have a completed final evaluation through the PDE 430 form, as well as a professional portfolio. The PDE 430 form will serve as the certification recommendation for the student.
Educational Leadership Course Descriptions
GRLDR 500 Conceptual Foundations for School Leadership  

 

3 credits
This course is an examination of the various philosophical and theoretical bases that can shape teaching and learning in the schools and, therefore, provide direction for the decision-making processes of the school principal. This is a prerequisite for all other courses in the leadership program, but may be taken concurrently with the first semester of GRED 510, Curriculum Theory, Development and Issues course.
GRLDR 510 Curriculum Theory, Development and Issues  

 

3 credits
This course provides an in-depth study of the major ideologies that have shaped curriculum theory and thought. A comprehensive investigation of effective primary and secondary educational programs for contemporary learners is undertaken. This course must be taken in sequence during one academic year, and must be completed within the first twelve semester hours of the program.
GRLDR 511 Curriculum Theory, Development and Issues  

 

3 credits
This course provides an in-depth study of the major ideologies that have shaped curriculum theory and thought. A specific field component, involving a critique of tone of the curriculum areas outside of the major disciplines, (e.g. fine arts, music, physical education, reading in the secondary schools, etc.), or of support services, (e.g. special education, counseling, library, nursing, etc.), will be required. This course must be taken in sequence during one academic year, and must be completed within the first twelve semester hours of the program.
GRLDR 520 The Principal as an Effective Agent of Change  

 

3 credits
This course undertakes an examination of the necessity for the principal to have broad “visions” about the school that are clear, active, ambitious, and performance-oriented. The creation of the climate to achieve such “visions” will also be investigated. In addition, students will come to understand that effective principals are willing to take risks and to seek innovative solutions. Strong emphasis will be placed on effective communication and intergroup relations.
GRLDR 570 School Law  

 

3 credits
The intent of this course is to familiarize teachers and administrators with the basic legal principles governing the structure and operation of school settings and the legal problems encountered in the day-to-day operation of schools. The broad principles of school governance as determined by statute and case law are emphasized. Special attention is given to Pennsylvania statutes, cases and decisions.
GRLDR 590 School/Community Relations  

 

3 credits
The use of language, both oral and written, will be explored and practiced by means of organized sets of experiences relevant to the role of a school principal. These will cover both content and presentation in interpersonal situations such as interviews, discussions, formal and informal speaking, and working with the media. They will address both content and structure in such areas as: correspondence, staff bulletins, newsletters, reports, and teacher observations. Involvement of the student at the school level will be required.
GRLDR 630 Personnel and Pupil Administration and Management  

 

3 credits
In this course, students identify what the principal needs to know about school law, student records, collective bargaining, and contract administration, and employment relations. Source materials will include: case studies, grievances, arbitration awards, contracts, etc.
GRLDR 680 The Improvement of Instruction, Staff Development, and Supervision  

 

3 credits This course includes a wide-ranging investigation of a variety of teaching models and research on teacher effectiveness, an understanding of which will enable the principal to facilitate the paramount objective of improving student performance.
GRLDR 687 Technology and the Administrator  

 

3 credits This course examines the role of the computer in planning, managing, maintaining, and monitoring the school’s educational, economic, and physical resources. Primary emphasis will be placed on long-range planning and on the financial and budgetary processes.
GRLDR 701 Internship/Educational Leadership  

 

4 credits Immediately upon successful completion of twenty-four semester hours of the program requirements, each student will select a pertinent, school-related project and will submit a formal written proposal for review and approval by the student’s school principal and college professor. This proposal must carefully define a program improvement and/or problem-solving project, and must describe the method of study, research, and evaluation, which will be carried out in the student’s home school. A log of all activities, materials and readings must be kept, and a comprehensive written research-supported report must be submitted during the second semester of the practicum. A formal oral presentation of the report will also be required at that time. In addition to scheduled classroom attendance, there will be ongoing individual conferences and school visitations by the college professor during the course of the practicum. This course may only be taken during the final academic year of the program.
Montessori Specialization
GRMON 520 Montessori Philosophy and Educational Theory  

 

3 credits This course describes the educational philosophical school of thought that influenced Maria Montessori. A second trend, emanating from science and the scientific method, forms a comparative study of her predecessors in the fields of child development, medicine, anthropology and pedagogy. Background relates the pedagogical principles of the Montessori method to today’s educational philosophies and methods.
GRMON 521 Montessori: Everyday Living/Art  

 

3 credits A study of the child’s environment and culture dictates the exercises that aid inner discipline, self-esteem, a sense of order, and muscular control. Montessori pedagogical principles provide the rationale for the demonstration techniques appropriate for the very young child. Prerequisite: GRMON 520, unless exempted by Program Director
GRMON 522 Montessori: Sensorial/Music  

 

3 credits
In this course, students explore the rationale and technique undergirding the refinement of sense perceptions as a means of acquiring classified, detailed and accurate knowledge from the environment. Students receive practical insight into the role of movement. Prerequisite: GRMON 520
GRMON 524 Montessori: Language  

 

3 credits This course provides the basis for a sound language program within the prepared Montessori environment. Discussion includes the responsibility of the teacher in the different levels of development that lead to writing and reading, in the sequencing of materials and in the adaptations to specific language needs of children, with special emphasis on the urban minority child. Prerequisite: GRMON 520
GRMON 525 Montessori: Natural and Social Sciences/Parent Education  

 

3 credits This course provides the student with material for the natural and social sciences used in the Montessori classroom. Presentations are programmed to the age and development of the child. Insights for the student about the wonders of nature, the interaction of human beings and nature are explored. Parent education discussion includes suggestions for developing parent-teacher partnerships and mutual responsibilities. Prerequisite: GRMON 520
GRMON 523 Montessori: Mathematics  

 

3 credits This course prepares the student to assess a child’s mathematical readiness, to introduce number with its properties of cardinality and ordinality, to develop the mathematical experience to include the basic operations with the didactic apparatus. This course forms part of the student’s preparation for the intern experience. Prerequisite: GRMON 520
GRMON 620/621 FALL Montessori: Practicum/Internship and seminar  

 

A year’s practicum/internship which brings together the theory, practice and curriculum of Montessori Education. Regularly scheduled biweekly seminars to correlate methods and student teaching run concurrently with the internship for both fall and spring semesters.
GRMON 622/623 SPRING Montessori: Practicum/Internship and seminar  

 

5 credits

 


A year’s practicum/internship which brings together the theory, practice and curriculum of Montessori Education. Regularly scheduled biweekly seminars to correlate methods and student teaching run concurrently with the internship for both fall and spring semesters.