Sociology, Criminal Justice, and Human Services Course Descriptions

Course descriptions that are designated with a (B) fulfill the Behavioral Ways of Knowing requirement of the Core Curriculum.

Combined B.S. Human Services/M.S. Administration of Human Services Program

The combined B.S./M.S. program provides an excellent opportunity for qualified Human Services majors in the School of Undergraduate Studies to complete a M.S. degree in Administration of Human Services in the School of Graduate Studies. Students majoring in Human Services in the School of Undergraduate Studies are eligible to apply to the program once they have achieved senior status (completion of 90 credits). Transfer students must take a minimum of 15 credits at Chestnut Hill College and earn an overall 3.0 GPA in these courses. Each student will be expected to complete the admissions requirement of the School of Graduate Studies and be provisionally accepted into the program before registering for any graduate courses. (Formal acceptance will be granted upon receipt of a transcript verifying successful completion of the undergraduate degree program.)

For more information, please contact Elaine R. Green, Ed.D. Program coordinator, 215.248.7172 green@chc.edu  

 

Criminal Justice

CRJU 122 Introduction to Criminal Justice (B)
Credits: 3
An examination of law enforcement, the administration of justice and the correctional system in the United States. Includes some international comparison.

CRJU 210/SOC 210 Gender and the Law (B)
Credits: 3
A historical-sociological treatment of the gender issues in the American legal system. Explores the successful and sometimes failed challenges mounted by advocates in the areas of politicla and civil rights, domestic and reproductive issues, employment opportunities, criminal justice and education.

CRJU 220 Juvenile Justice (B)
Credits: 3
A study of the American juvenile justice system from historical, legal and policy perspectives. Topics will include juvenile court, United States Supreme Court cases, juvenile probation, restorative justice, rehabilitation and prevention programs.

CRJU 223 Criminal Law (B)
Credits: 3
An exploration of the basic concepts and issues in substantive criminal law. Appellate case analysis will include definitions of crime, defenses to crime and contemporary controversial issues.

CRJU 224 Criminal Investigation
Credits: 3
Principles and practices for getting the maximum amount of information to solve a crime. Proper procedure in the handling of witnesses, informants, suspects and surveillants. Methods for discovering, interpreting and preserving the physical evidence left at the crime scene. Does not satisfy the Ways of Knowing requirement in the Behavioral Sciences.

CRJU 225 Criminal Procedure (B)
Credits: 3
An exploration of the constitutional areas of the criminal procedure. Appellate case analysis will explore such issues as search and seizure, arrest, confessions, right to counsel and recent Supreme Court decisions.

CRJU 226/SOC 226 Deviance and Social Control
Credits: 3
A sociological examination of deviant behavior and society’s response to it. Focuses of the meanings of deviance within particular social contexts: deviant subcultures, political uses of deviance, moral crusades and social change.

CRJU 227 Corrections (B)
Credits: 3
Examines prisons and punishment. Topics to be covered include: philosophies of corrections, the development of prisons, institutional issues, penal reform and alternatives to incarceration.

CRJU 230 Juvenile Delinquency (B)
Credits: 3
An historical and contemporary study of youth crime. Topics will include: theoretical analysis, programs and policy, and current problems such as youth violence, drugs and gangs.

CRJU 245 Inside-Out
Credits: 3
The Inside-Out Prison Exchange is a unique experiential education class where students learn about the criminal justice system throught dialogue. The class will meet inside a prison. Half of the students will be Chestnut Hill College students, half will be men incarcerated at the prison. Students will read, discuss, and solve problems together. Weekly and cumulative writings are required. Prequisites: Permission of the instructor and a willingness to attend ALL of the class sessions.

CRJU 321 Criminology
Credits: 3
A study of the biological, psychological and sociological theories of crime. Classical theories, contemporary research and policy applications will be considered.

CRJU 481 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (B)
Credits: 3
An in-depth investigation of a topic chosen by the instructor. 
 

Human Services

HSVC 105 Introduction to Human Services (B)
Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to the role of the human service professional. Students will examine the development of social welfare institutions, philosophies, practices and policies in diverse human service settings. A systems approach and generalist practice perspective will assist students in the development of core competencies necessary for problem solving and planned social change and advocacy efforts. (25 hrs of fieldwork experience required for Human Service majors)

HSVC 219 Child Welfare
Credits: 3
This course is intended to develop an understanding of the child welfare system, with special attention to its history in the United States, its policies, current societal problems and their impact on children and their families. The course prepares students to work in the child welfare and criminal justice fields of service with special attention given to foster care, adoption, residential care and the court system. Ethical issues will be addressed.

HSVC/SOCI 250 Heart of the City (B)
Credits: 3
(A collaborative six-credit course – 3 credits in HSU/SOCU 205 and 3 credits in RLSTU 250)
Examines the human person and the human condition from the academic disciplines of sociology, human services and religion. Provides opportunities for first hand experiences to enable the student to reflect more deeply on the human struggle for meaning, existence and even survival. Through service learning, the student is given a unique point for observing and sharing in the journey of life through the eyes, ears and hearts of those who find themselves on the fringe of life in the heart of the city.

HSVC 257 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (B)
Credits: 3
This course will explore human behavior in the social environment through the lens of a systems theory framework and practice. Students will assess and evaluate how individuals function within families, groups, organizations, institutions and communities during the key stages of the human lifespan. Developmental milestones and environmental issues will be explored. Particular attention will be given to human diversity and populations at risk through the use of vignettes and case examples.

HSVC 301/302 Human Services Fieldwork with Seminar
Credits: 3
Field placement for human services students at social welfare agencies, public interest groups, community health centers, programs for older adults and governmental organizations. Supervision by a field supervisor employed by the agency and a liaison from the College faculty. Prerequisite: Junior Status.

HSVC 308 Theory and Practice of Counseling
Credits: 3
This course presents an introduction and overview to the practice and profession of counseling. It will emphasize the counseling process, professional preparation, ethical and legal issues, assessment and diagnosis, counseling from a multicultural perspective, research and evaluation, major theorists, as well as counseling with families, children and adolescents and groups. Approaches with families, married couples, and those working directly with the mentally ill are explored.

HSVC 356 Social Welfare Policy (B)
Credits: 3
Analyzes social welfare in the United States and the role played by public and private agencies in the delivery of services. Special attention is given to welfare policy as it relates to the problems that confront urban America. (25 hours of fieldwork required for Human Service Majors)

HSVC 358 Human Service Methods (B)
Credits: 3
Analyzes methods, processes and practices used in human services. Skills needed for competent practice are studied. Interviewing, assessment, support systems, goal planning, empathy, brokering, professional ethics and advocacy are considered. Prerequisite: HSU 105.

HSVC 399 Administration of Human Services (B)
Credits: 3
The functions/roles of human service organization management including: organization theory and structure, program planning and evaluation, human resource management, fiscal accountability and legal issues will be the focus of this overview course.

HSVC 400 Honors
Independent study during junior and senior years culminating in an honors thesis determined by the interests of the student. By departmental invitation only.

HSVC 401/402 Human Services Fieldwork with Seminar
Credits: 3
Field placement for human services students at social welfare agencies, public interest groups, community health centers, programs for older adults and governmental organizations. Supervision by a field supervisor employed by the agency and a liaison from the College faculty. Prerequisite: Senior Status. (See Academic Program/Internship)

 

HSVC 403  Human Services Fieldwork with Seminar II

HSVC 481 Special Topics in Human Services (B)
Credits: 3
An in-depth investigation of a topic chosen by the instructor.

HSVC 498 Human Services Senior Seminar
Credits: 3
Each student will engage in independent research, and write a scholarly paper, and give a professional presentation to the department and college community. topics are approved by the instructor and provide an opportunity to carefully examine a current issue in Human Services. Offered every Spring.

 

Sociology

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (B)
Credits: 3
An invitation to the study of sociology. An analysis of the nature of human society and groups, cultural factors and social institutions. Areas covered include: stratification, socialization, family, gender, deviance, work and social change.

SOCI 102 Sociology Through Film (B)
Credits: 3
Examines key sociological concepts through viewing current and classic films and relating classic and contemporary readings in sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOCI 103 Social Problems (B) (Writing Intensive)
Credits: 3
Examines and explores the various social problems in American society and how they affect and are affected by societal attitudes. Theoretical perspectives will be applied to such problems as poverty, substance abuse, violence, sexism, racism, ageism, environmental problems and terrorism. Service-learning may be incorporated. (If taken as Writing Intensive, prerequisites are ENGU 101/105 and ILA).

SOCI 104 Major Global Problems (B)
Credits: 3
A study of several selected problems facing the world community today including the inequality of individuals, groups and nations, world hunger, population growth, environmental issues and war and peace.

SOCI 114 Social Gerontology (B)
Credits: 3
An introduction to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of aging. Students will be introduced to aging issues by examining the demographic characteristics of this group. The course will focus on how these characteristics impact attitudes about older persons and aging, the provision of services to older adults as well as the development of aging policy issues.

SOCI 125 The Family (B)
Credits: 3
A cross-cultural and historical treatment of the institution of marriage and the family including a sociological analysis of the modern family, patterns of dating and courtship, and the changing definitions concerning the contemporary family.

SOCI 126 Gender and Society (B)
Credits: 3
The dynamics of sex and gender in society. The social sources of human sexual identity, gender formation, sex-role stereotyping and correlated behaviors. A cross-cultural survey of institutional sex roles followed by an examination of sex roles in contemporary society.

SOCI 127 Ethnicity (B)
Credits: 3
Explores the current rise in the interest of ethnic roots within the context of the variety and experiences of America’s numerous minority groups. Examines lifestyles, adaptations and problems of identity as well as assimilation, prejudice, discrimination and immigration issues. Includes global issues of ethnicity.

SOCI 128 Rights, Responsibilities and Reform (B)
Credits: 3
Classical and contemporary theories of social change critically examined in historical context. The relationship of social change to human communities, world ecology and world government is studied. Planning for change with attendant questions about global values and social policy will be considered.

SOCI 200 World Justice and Care for Children (B)
Credits: 3
A global study of human rights for children including an examination of historical and contemporary conditions, international development programs, and current social and moral issues.

SOCI 201 Social Inequality (Writing Intensive) (B)
Credits: 3
An examination of structured social inequality. Among the major forms discussed will be class-based, racial and ethnic, and gender inequalities. Course emphasizes basic tools available to social scientists for exploring the social world. Prerequisites are ENGU 101/105 and ILA.

SOCI 210/CRJU 210 Gender and the Law (B)
Credits: 3
A historical-sociological treatment of the gender issues in the American legal system. Explores the successful and sometimes failed challenges mounted by advocates in the areas of political and civil rights, domestic and reproductive issues, employment opportunities, criminal justice and education.

SOCI 211 Environmental Law (B)
Credits: 3
Introduces students to the evolving field of environmental law with a special focus on national and international issues. Studies specific cases regarding environmental degradation, protection and regulatory enforcement.

SOCI 215 Sociology of Death (B)
Credits: 3
A global study of life, death and dying from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include the social meaning of death, grief and mourning practices, hospice programs, suicide, euthanasia and mega death.

SOCI 216 Sociology of Health and Medicine (B)
Credits: 3
An analysis of health, illness and the health professions from a sociological and a socio-psychological perspective. Topics include health attitudes and behavior, the socialization of health professionals, the organizations of health care and patient-professional relationships.

SOCI 226/CRJU 226 Deviance/and Social Control
Credits: 3
A sociological examination of deviant behavior and society’s response to it. Focuses of the meanings of deviance within particular social contexts: deviant subcultures, political uses of deviance, moral crusades and social change.

SOCI 250 Heart of the City (B)
Credits: 3
(See HSU 250) This is a six (6) credit course. Three (3) credits in Sociology or Human services and three (3) in Religious Studies.

SOCI 300 Sociological Theory (Writing Intensive) (B)
Credits: 3
Examines major ideas of classical and contemporary sociologists within their social context. Emphasizes the practical application of theoretical concepts, critical thinking about social topics and communicating ideas through writing. (If taken as Writing Intensive, prerequisites are ENGU 101/105 and ILA).

SOCI 302 Social Science Research Methods
Credits: 3
A study of the research process including fieldwork, surveys, documentary research and experiments. An introduction to basic statistical concepts and data analysis. Prerequisites are ENGU 101/105, ILA and SOCU 201 (25 hours fieldwork required for Human Service Majors)

SOCI 303 Advanced Social Science Research Methods
Credits: 3
The implementation of a research proposal. Offered as needed. Prerequisite: SOCU 302 and approval of instructor.

SOCI 400 Honors
Independent study during junior and senior years culminating in an honors thesis determined by the interests of the student. By departmental invitation only.

SOCI 401 and 402 Internship in Sociology
Fieldwork placement in a work environment related to the student's career interests.

SOCI 481 Special Topics in Sociology (B)
Credits: 3
An in-depth investigation of a topic chosen by the instructor.

SOCI 498 Senior Seminar in Sociology
Credits: 3
Each student will engage in independent research, write a scholarly paper, and give a professional presentation on an approved topic. Offered every Spring.