English and Communications Course Descriptions

English

ENGU 100 Developmental Essay Writing
Credits: 3

This course prepares students for English 101, helping them to develop fundamental writing skills such as grammar, paragraph development, and organization. Beyond skill development, the class teaches students to read short essays and write their own short essays with purpose and focus. Students learn to see writing as a process as they plan, draft, edit and revise papers. This course does not address research but does introduce students to incorporating outside voices into an essay (through quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing).
This course does not satisfy the general education requirement in college writing. Students who successfully complete this course must register for ENGL 101 the following semester. The three credits may be used for elective credits. Offered every Fall.

ENGL 101: College Writing
Credits: 3

This course prepares students to write in college, focusing on essay writing (the skills, techniques and process of essay writing), argument (analysis, synthesis and development of arguments), and research (the process of locating, accessing, evaluating, interpreting, and using a variety of sources). Students learn to see writing as a process as they plan, draft, edit and revise papers. Students write multiple papers on the same topic, each time for a different purpose and a different audience in order to develop and deepen a topic and to write for different situations. Students must successfully complete this course before taking ILAU. Offered every semester.

ENGL 104: Introduction to Literature (L, W)
Credits: 3

Introduction and study of the literary elements of fiction, poetry, and drama. Course provides guidelines for analyzing and writing about literature. Offered as needed.

ENGL 105: Advanced College Writing (W)
Credits: 3

Instruction builds upon skills presented in ENGL 101. Students develop skills of academic writing, critical analysis, and research techniques common to all disciplines. For students who qualify, this course fulfills the general education requirement in college writing.

*Students who take this course to fulfill the general education requirement must take another course to fulfill the writing intensive component. This course may fulfill the writing intensive component if the student has already taken ENGL 101. Offered every Fall.

 

ENGL 110: Elements of the Research Paper 

Credits: 1.5 

Geared towards transfer students who did not take ENGL-101 at the College. Also open to students who may need extra preparation for writing research papers. Reviews the fundamentals of the research process (locating and evaluating sources) and, primarily, integrating sources into one’s own writing (interpreting research; ethically summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting sources; properly documenting sources). To engage in these processes, students will compile an annotated bibliography of reputable sources. Students also will complete short papers/assignments and will participate in peer workshops. Reviews some common problem areas in grammar and style, such as sentence structure, punctuation, and conciseness, to assist students in writing clearly and for research purposes.

ENGL 175: The Short Story (L)
Credits: 3

An investigation of the formal short story as a relatively recent genre of narrative fiction using readings from international and American authors. Attention is given to the limits and possibilities posed by the brevity of form in relation to modern cultural experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent

ENGL 201: Shakespeare's Heros and Heroines (L)
Credits: 3

A study and in-depth analysis of ten plays including histories, tragedies and comedies. Attention to dramatic art, language, and characters. Offered alternate Spring semesters. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or IDHP 200. 

 

ENGL 202: Shakespeare in Love an War (L)
Credits: 3
 

A study of the sonnets and ten plays not included in ENGL 201. Offered alternate Spring semesters. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or IDHP 200 

 

ENGL 204: Writing Literary Non-Fiction 

Credits: 3 

Students will be exposed to forms of literary nonfiction in order to produce their own writing in the genres of the essay, memoir, and new journalism. Readings

may include works by Orwell, de Montaigne, Frank McCourt, David Sedaris, Mary Karr and Mark Bowden. Pre-Requisites: ENGL101, 105; or IDHP 200. 

 

ENGL 205: American Poetry (L) 

Credits: 3  

A study of the spirit and form that makes American poetry “American.” Readings from early American poets to the present with attention to conventions of the genre. Pre-Requisite: ENGL- 101, 105; or IDHP-200. When offered as a hybrid course, Pre-Requisites may vary. 

 

 

 

ENGL 225: 18th Century British Literature (L) 

Credits: 3 

Readings in English literature from the Restoration to the pre-Romantics with emphasis on satire and the beginnings of the novel. Pre-Requisite: ENGL 101, 105; or IDHP 200. 

 

ENGL 228: Modern Drama (L) 

Credits: 3  

Intensive reading of major American, British and continental dramatists. Emphasizes historical development and staging of plays. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

 

ENGL 238: Victorian Literature (L) 

Credits: 3 

Readings in major works written during the reign of Victoria (1837-1901) with attention to the religious, scientific, social, and aesthetic “questions” of the time. Authors may include Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Mill, Ruskin, Morris, Rossetti, Dickens, Bronte, and Hopkins. Pre-requisite: ENGL-101, 105 or IDHP-200. 

ENGL 250: Creative Writing
Credits: 3

Students improve their writing by analyzing themes and techniques of major writers. Students submit their own stories, plays or poems to the class to critique. Does not satisfy the humanities requirement or the English minor requirements. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

ENGL 251: African American Writers (L)
Credits: 3

Readings in all genres of African-American literature covering historical periods including slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights and black arts movements and the contemporary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

ENGL 264: Early American Literature, contact-1820 (L)
Credits: 3

Readings in American literature that cover texts from the moment of contact, Native American texts, Puritan texts including sermons, captivity narratives, early American poetry and fiction, and works by Founding Fathers. Authors may include Winthrop, Bradford, Smith, Bradstreet, Edwards, Franklin, Wheatley, Jefferson, and Apess. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

ENGL 266: Modern American Literature, 1865-1945 (L)
Credits: 3

Readings in all genres of American literature that cover literary movements including Realism, Naturalism, Regionalism, and Modernism and feature writers such as Twain, Dickinson, Crane, DuBois, Fitzgerald, O’Neill, Eliot, Hemingway, Hughes and Hurston. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

ENGL 267: Contemporary American Literature, 1940-present (L)
Credits: 3

Readings in all genres of American literature that cover the Beat movement, writers from the Civil Rights and black power movements, metafiction, post-modernism and the emergence of ethnic voices in American literature. Authors may include Williams, Ginsberg, Plath, Baldwin, Ellison, Roth, Bellow, Momaday, Vonnegut, Capote Mailer, Lorde, Rich O’Brien and Morrison. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

ENGL 280: American Literature of the 1920’s: The Lost Generation (L, W)
Credits: 3

Analysis of some of the most influential American writers at home and abroad in the 1920s, including ex-patriots Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Eliot, Stein and other Americans writing in the aftermath of World War I. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

ENGL 338: Age of Chaucer (L)
Credits: 3

A study of the Canterbury Tales and readings of other medieval works with their relation to art, music and literature. Studies Middle English and its origins. Offered every Fall. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent  

 

ENGL 342: Contemporary British and Irish Fiction 

Credits: 3  

Seminar study of a single author or selected authors connected by a theme or historical movement in British literature. Readings from primary texts as well as literary criticism relevant to those texts lead to a focused research project. Possible seminar topics could include: children in Blake and Dickens, Modernist Writers in the 1930s; Larkin and the Movement Poets, novels of empire and return. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent. 

ENGL 488 Research Writing
Credits: 3

This course provides students with an opportunity to practice discipline-specific research and research writing techniques and to learn how to plan and organize the research and writing process to prepare them for the guided but independent work of the Senior Seminar project.

ENGL 498 Senior Seminar
Credits: 3

This course is the capstone experience for the English and the English /Communication major. Forms of critical theory, skills of research and critical analysis will be reviewed as student work toward the independent production of a final thesis, necessary for graduation in the major. Offered every Spring Pre-requisite ENGL 4** Research Writing.

ENGL 400 Departmental Honors

Independent study during junior and senior years culminating in an honors thesis determined by the interests of the student. By Departmental invitation only.

 

Communications

 

COMM 102: Newspaper Workshop
Credits: 1

How to write and edit AP style news and feature articles, produce writing samples for their portfolios, and/or utilize their graphic design skills, while earning applied credits. It was created in response to a need expressed by the current editors and advisor of the newspaper to encourage greater student participation, especially among incoming freshman. The newspaper cannot fully function without committed, regular student involvement. It is crucial that students also receive some professional training on how to conduct interviews, quote sources, and write and edit AP style articles. Graded Pass/Fail only. Repeatable for up to three credits.

 

COMM 110: Introduction to Communications (B)
Credits: 3
 

An examination of the factors that enhance or inhibit effective communication in a variety of settings including interpersonal, intercultural, group, organizational and mass communication settings. Offered every Fall.

 

COMM 112: Television Workshop
Credits: 1

Teaches students how to gather and disseminate the campus television news. Provides hands-on opportunities to write, shoot, narrate and edit a complete story, anchor the news and work with a crew. Repeatable for up to three credits.

 

COMM 141: Introduction to Journalism
Credits: 3

Introduces students to the principles and methods of journalistic writing. Students learn how to write for major types of news media: newspaper, in both print and online versions, radio and television.

 

COMM 201: Introduction to Film Analysis
Credits: 3

Traces the historical foundations of film production and progresses to current
trends. An overview of film history, narrative, genre, aesthetics and production guidelines will be covered. Students will learn to analyze and write critically about film.

 

COMM 203: Visual Literacy
Credits: 3

 Introduces students to the principles of visual design and composition used in media production. Students analyze the creative techniques used in photography and film. This course serves as a foundation for video production courses.

 

COMM 210: Interpersonal and Organizational Communication (B)
Credits: 3
 

A study of the ways in which people generate meaning in interpersonal transactions through the use of language, space, gesture, sexuality, and time. Analyzes dynamics of communication processes within the contexts of organizations including topics such as motivation, leadership, and decision-making.

 

COMM 221: Video Design and Production I
Credits: 3

A basic “hands on” introduction to video production, with emphasis on learning how to use the camera and related equipment, developing visual stories, writing a treatment and pre-production organizing and planning. Students will focus on understanding light, becoming familiar with production terms and equipment, improving shot design, planning for camera movement and placement, “shooting to edit”, and harnessing the power of sound. Various aesthetic as well as ethical concerns are covered. Pre-requisite: COMM 203. 

 

COMM-230: Audio Production
Credits: 3

In today's world, the role of audio production has expanded tremendously as technology continues to broaden the communication horizon. The skills and techniques you will learn in this course will have direct application to audio needs in many industries: radio/television broadcasting, movies, music, and the worldwide web. This extremely "hands on" course will teach you about the production process; how to prepare and write a script for recording, how to record sounds correctly, how to edit digital audio information, and how to create exciting, almost three dimensional, audio environments. In short, you will learn how to "manipulate" sounds - narration, music, and sound effects - to create dynamic productions that will absorb your audiences. In so doing, you will then experience the great reward of taking a concept from thought to something that can be heard by an audience who will then create ideas of their own which you intended to produce. As an additional benefit, you will learn how to more successfully incorporate sound into your production arsenal of techniques and tools. This is great for video, film, and even business presentations. Evoking human emotion through the power of sound is what this course is all about.

 

COMM 251: Mass Media and Society (B)
Credits: 3
 

Investigates books, newspapers, magazines, radio, television and film as mass media. Critically analyzes mass media as a reflection of and an influence on society. Examination of social, political, economic, and technological aspects. Offered every Spring.

 

COMM 252:  Writing for Electronic Media (W)
Credits: 3
 

Explores persuasive techniques for Web writing including online journalism, public relations, corporate communication, and other online media. Pre-Requisites: ENGL-101 or 105 and ILAR-101; or IDHP-200. 

 

COMM 253: Public Speaking
Credits: 3
 

Practice in writing and presenting speeches of information and other forms of public speaking. Shared criticisms. Psychology of audience response and appeal. Development of skill in using PowerPoint presentations. Offered every Spring.

 

COMM 254: Advertising (B)
Credits: 3
 

Covers advertising objectives, research, creative execution, media selection, legal and ethical requirements and budgeting. Students design and present an advertising campaign. Offered every Spring.

 

COMM 255: Public Relations (B)
Credits: 3
 

Study of principles and techniques used in communication between an organization and any individual or audience. Examines media and press releases, promotions and trade shows, community and customer relations. Students plan and present a public relations campaign. Offered every Fall.

 

COMM 258: Scriptwriting (W)
Credits: 3
 

This course focuses upon the essential elements of writing clear, concise, and dynamic short scripts for film and video productions. Through writing exercises, students will learn how to write realistic dialogue, visually compelling scenes, and precise technical instructions for crew. Both documentary and narrative formats will be explored. Offered every Fall.

 

COMM 260: Public Relations Writing (W)
Credits: 3
 

This coursefocuses on how public relations materials are created and used to communicate key themes to various audiences. Using journalistic techniques, students will write press releases and newspaper and/or magazine articles designed to generate media attention for an organization or product. By the end of the course, students will have created a diverse portfolio of their public relations writing which may also include a newsletter, brochure, speech, pitch letter, and additional collateral public relations materials, such as bio sheets and organization or product fact sheets. Offered every Spring.

 

COMM 265: Writing and Editing for Magazines (W)
Credits: 3
 

Workshop approach provides experience in the basics of magazine writing, editing and publishing: how to analyze a publication, translate an idea into a magazine article, put together a storyboard, and identify software programs appropriate for formal and informal publications. Emphasizes use of advertising in magazine industry. Examines strategies needed to enter the field where creating a network is as necessary as developing a portfolio. Offered every Spring. Pre-Requisites: COMM 241; ENGL 101 or 105  and ILAR 101; or IDHP 200. 

 

COMM 275: Persuasive Methods
Credits: 3

 Addresses the theories and applications specific to persuasive communication
methods in social, political, and mass media contexts. Course material will focus on persuasive messages in commercial advertising, print media, political rhetoric, electronic communities, propaganda campaigns, and public service messages.

 

COMM 310: Theories and Research Methods
Credits: 3
 

An examination of communication theories and problem solving research. Students learn how to interpret, analyze, and integrate significant data through literature review research. Offered every Fall.

 

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COMM 325: Video Design and Production II
Credits: 3

Students increase their mastery of planning and production, develop treatments, write a script, develop shot lists, write location reports, and learn to organize and create production books. Students shoot and edit to increase their use of sophisticated nonlinear digital editing techniques. Pre- Requisite: COMM 221.

 

COMM 401-402: Communications Internship
Credits: 3 each
 

Field work for the qualified student in the areas of broadcasting, print journalism, advertising or public relations at sites approved by the Department Chair or Program Coordinator. 

 

COMM 481-482: Special Topics
Credits: 3
 

An investigation of a topic in communication chosen by the instructor as described in the course schedules for the semester.
 

COMM 498: Seminar in Communications and Technology
Credits: 3
 

Students integrate research, questionnaire development, a literature review and the writing of a comprehensive paper with state-of-the-art technologies for presentation. Offered Spring 2007.

Computer Applications Descriptions

CMTC 200: Introduction to Web Development and Design
Credits: 3

Students examine current web design techniques and learn how to create effective web pages using a web-authoring suite, such as Macromedia Dreamweaver. Prerequisite: Completion of computer proficiency.

CMTC 205: Computer Graphics Design
Credits: 3

Through the use of computer graphics technology, students will learn how to use the powerful and creative tools in Adobe Illustrator to create original artwork, edit clipart, and generate unusual and stylized text. Emphasis will be placed on the use of vector/object-oriented software as a design tool in the fields of graphic and fine art. Also included will be discussion regarding the considerations necessary for final output including color models, resolution, inkjet and offset printing and preparation for the Web. Prerequisites: CMTC 101 & 102 or equivalent. Offered every Fall.

CMTC 210: Computer Graphics with Photoshop
Credits: 3

Students learn the essentials of image enhancement by developing the understanding and skills needed to edit raster/bitmapped graphics. Students will explore the basic concepts of color correction, photo retouching, compositing (photo montages), photographic manipulation, digital darkroom techniques and the preparation of images for use on the World Wide Web. Image resolution, color models and printing issues are also covered. Prerequisites: CMTC 101 & 102 or equivalent. Offered every Spring.

CMTC 215: Desktop Publishing and Graphics Design
Credits: 3

Students learn the theory and techniques of desktop publishing. The software program used for this course is QuarkXPress which is the leading layout and design software for publishers. Prerequisites: CMTC 101, 102 & 142 or equivalent. Recommended: CMTC 205 or 210.

CMTC 221: Video Design and Production I
Credits: 3

A basic “hands on” introduction to video production, with emphasis on learning how to use the camera and related equipment, developing visual stories, writing a treatment and pre-production organizing and planning. Students will focus on understanding light, becoming familiar with production terms and equipment, improving shot design, planning for camera movement and placement, “shooting to edit”, and harnessing the power of sound. Various aesthetic as well as ethical concerns are covered.

CMTC 230: Information Systems for Organizations
Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to communications systems. Students consider local information exchanged through global networking including e-mail, bulletin boards, teleconferencing and interactive global dialogues. Additional topics incorporate the study of communications hardware and software and the ethical and moral issues emanating from the communications explosion. Prerequisites: CMTC 101, 102, 142, and CMSCU 150.

CMTC 300 :Web Design: Programming in xHTML and Javascript
Credits: 3

This course introduces the students to creating interactive web pages using xHTML and Javascript. Students will incorporate design techniques developed in CMTC 200. Prerequisite: CMTC 200

CMTC 320: Presentations in Multimedia
Credits: 3

This goal is a multimedia production in which students combine text, graphics, audio and video in an original creation. Students acquire skill in the analysis and application of presentation software Macromedia Director. This course is for students who desire to develop modes of communication and presentation that utilize the potential of developing technologies. Prerequisites: CMTC 205 OR CMTC 210; Recommended UCIT 221

CMTC 325: Video Design and Production II
Credits: 3

Students increase their mastery of planning and production, develop treatments, write a script, develop shot lists, write location reports, and learn to organize and create production books. Students shoot and edit to increase their use of sophisticated non-linear digital editing techniques. Prerequisite: CMTC 221

CMTC 340: Information Management (BADM 280)
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of information management using Oracle, from simple applications through database programming and Structured Query Language. This course includes an analysis and evaluation of social and ethical issues stemming from the proliferation of databases. Recommended for students planning a career in business and information sciences. Prerequisite:  CMTC 180